Perceived neighborhood quality, sleep quality, and health status: Evidence from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin

Lauren Hale, Terrence Hill, Elliot Friedman, F. Javier Nieto, Loren W. Galvao, Corinne D. Engelman, Kristen M C Malecki, Paul E. Peppard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Why does living in a disadvantaged neighborhood predict poorer mental and physical health? Recent research focusing on the Southwestern United States suggests that disadvantaged neighborhoods favor poor health, in part, because they undermine sleep quality. Building on previous research, we test whether this process extends to the Midwestern United States. Specifically, we use cross-sectional data from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin (SHOW), a statewide probability sample of Wisconsin adults, to examine whether associations among perceived neighborhood quality (e.g., perceptions of crime, litter, and pleasantness in the neighborhood) and health status (overall self-rated health and depression) are mediated by overall sleep quality (measured as self-rated sleep quality and physician diagnosis of sleep apnea). We find that perceptions of low neighborhood quality are associated with poorer self-rated sleep quality, poorer self-rated health, and more depressive symptoms. We also observe that poorer self-rated sleep quality is associated with poorer self-rated health and more depressive symptoms. Our mediation analyses indicate that self-rated sleep quality partially mediates the link between perceived neighborhood quality and health status. Specifically, self-rated sleep quality explains approximately 20% of the association between neighborhood quality and self-rated health and nearly 19% of the association between neighborhood quality and depression. Taken together, these results confirm previous research and extend the generalizability of the indirect effect of perceived neighborhood context on health status through sleep quality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-22
Number of pages7
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume79
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health Surveys
sleep
Health Status
health status
Sleep
health
evidence
Health
Depression
Vulnerable Populations
Midwestern United States
Southwestern United States
Research
Sampling Studies
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Crime
Mental Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Physicians
mediation

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Neighborhood context
  • Neighborhood quality
  • Self-rated health
  • Sleep
  • Sleep quality
  • USA
  • Wisconsin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Perceived neighborhood quality, sleep quality, and health status : Evidence from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin. / Hale, Lauren; Hill, Terrence; Friedman, Elliot; Javier Nieto, F.; Galvao, Loren W.; Engelman, Corinne D.; Malecki, Kristen M C; Peppard, Paul E.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 79, No. 1, 02.2013, p. 16-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hale, Lauren ; Hill, Terrence ; Friedman, Elliot ; Javier Nieto, F. ; Galvao, Loren W. ; Engelman, Corinne D. ; Malecki, Kristen M C ; Peppard, Paul E. / Perceived neighborhood quality, sleep quality, and health status : Evidence from the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin. In: Social Science and Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 79, No. 1. pp. 16-22.
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