Performance, clinical chemistry, and carcass responses of finishing lambs to recombinant bovine somatotropin and bovine placental lactogen.

C. L. McLaughlin, J. C. Byatt, H. B. Hedrick, J. J. Veenhuizen, D. F. Curran, R. L. Hintz, G. F. Hartnell, T. R. Kasser, Robert J Collier, C. A. Baile

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Bovine placental lactogen (PL) is a partial somatotropin agonist in the cow and decreases urea nitrogen, indicating increased nitrogen retention. In the present study, the somatogenic effects of bovine PL (bPL; 4 and 8 mg/d) were compared with those of bovine somatotropin (bST; 4 and 8 mg/d) in finishing lambs. Measures of comparison included growth performance, carcass composition, and growth-related clinical chemistry traits. Although feed efficiency during the first 3 wk of treatment with bPL was improved by 14% (P < .05), feed efficiency for the full 6-wk treatment period did not differ from that of control lambs. Responsiveness to bPL may have been attenuated by high titer antibodies present after 2 wk of treatment. However, bPL also did not influence growth-related clinical chemistry traits during short-term (7 d) treatment, strongly suggesting that bPL was ineffective in finishing lambs at the doses tested. In contrast, bST improved 6-wk feed efficiency by an average of 17% (P < .05) and decreased feed intake by an average of 12% (P < .05). In addition, measures of carcass composition including longissimus muscle area, specific gravity of the rack, kidney and pelvic fat, and fat thickness demonstrated that bST, but not bPL, treatment decreased carcass fatness and increased carcass leanness. Treatment with bST, but not with bPL, affected IGF-I, insulin, glucose, and urea nitrogen in a dose-related manner. Thus, daily injections of bPL did not affect either performance or carcass quality, whereas performance and carcass responses of finishing lambs to bST were consistent with those reported by others.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3307-3318
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Animal Science
Volume71
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

choriomammotropin
Placental Lactogen
Clinical Chemistry
somatotropin
Growth Hormone
finishing
chemistry
lambs
feed conversion
cattle
carcass composition
urea nitrogen
Nitrogen
Urea
fat thickness
carcass quality
Therapeutics
insulin-like growth factor I
Growth
dosage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

McLaughlin, C. L., Byatt, J. C., Hedrick, H. B., Veenhuizen, J. J., Curran, D. F., Hintz, R. L., ... Baile, C. A. (1993). Performance, clinical chemistry, and carcass responses of finishing lambs to recombinant bovine somatotropin and bovine placental lactogen. Journal of Animal Science, 71(12), 3307-3318.

Performance, clinical chemistry, and carcass responses of finishing lambs to recombinant bovine somatotropin and bovine placental lactogen. / McLaughlin, C. L.; Byatt, J. C.; Hedrick, H. B.; Veenhuizen, J. J.; Curran, D. F.; Hintz, R. L.; Hartnell, G. F.; Kasser, T. R.; Collier, Robert J; Baile, C. A.

In: Journal of Animal Science, Vol. 71, No. 12, 12.1993, p. 3307-3318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McLaughlin, CL, Byatt, JC, Hedrick, HB, Veenhuizen, JJ, Curran, DF, Hintz, RL, Hartnell, GF, Kasser, TR, Collier, RJ & Baile, CA 1993, 'Performance, clinical chemistry, and carcass responses of finishing lambs to recombinant bovine somatotropin and bovine placental lactogen.', Journal of Animal Science, vol. 71, no. 12, pp. 3307-3318.
McLaughlin, C. L. ; Byatt, J. C. ; Hedrick, H. B. ; Veenhuizen, J. J. ; Curran, D. F. ; Hintz, R. L. ; Hartnell, G. F. ; Kasser, T. R. ; Collier, Robert J ; Baile, C. A. / Performance, clinical chemistry, and carcass responses of finishing lambs to recombinant bovine somatotropin and bovine placental lactogen. In: Journal of Animal Science. 1993 ; Vol. 71, No. 12. pp. 3307-3318.
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abstract = "Bovine placental lactogen (PL) is a partial somatotropin agonist in the cow and decreases urea nitrogen, indicating increased nitrogen retention. In the present study, the somatogenic effects of bovine PL (bPL; 4 and 8 mg/d) were compared with those of bovine somatotropin (bST; 4 and 8 mg/d) in finishing lambs. Measures of comparison included growth performance, carcass composition, and growth-related clinical chemistry traits. Although feed efficiency during the first 3 wk of treatment with bPL was improved by 14{\%} (P < .05), feed efficiency for the full 6-wk treatment period did not differ from that of control lambs. Responsiveness to bPL may have been attenuated by high titer antibodies present after 2 wk of treatment. However, bPL also did not influence growth-related clinical chemistry traits during short-term (7 d) treatment, strongly suggesting that bPL was ineffective in finishing lambs at the doses tested. In contrast, bST improved 6-wk feed efficiency by an average of 17{\%} (P < .05) and decreased feed intake by an average of 12{\%} (P < .05). In addition, measures of carcass composition including longissimus muscle area, specific gravity of the rack, kidney and pelvic fat, and fat thickness demonstrated that bST, but not bPL, treatment decreased carcass fatness and increased carcass leanness. Treatment with bST, but not with bPL, affected IGF-I, insulin, glucose, and urea nitrogen in a dose-related manner. Thus, daily injections of bPL did not affect either performance or carcass quality, whereas performance and carcass responses of finishing lambs to bST were consistent with those reported by others.",
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AU - McLaughlin, C. L.

AU - Byatt, J. C.

AU - Hedrick, H. B.

AU - Veenhuizen, J. J.

AU - Curran, D. F.

AU - Hintz, R. L.

AU - Hartnell, G. F.

AU - Kasser, T. R.

AU - Collier, Robert J

AU - Baile, C. A.

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N2 - Bovine placental lactogen (PL) is a partial somatotropin agonist in the cow and decreases urea nitrogen, indicating increased nitrogen retention. In the present study, the somatogenic effects of bovine PL (bPL; 4 and 8 mg/d) were compared with those of bovine somatotropin (bST; 4 and 8 mg/d) in finishing lambs. Measures of comparison included growth performance, carcass composition, and growth-related clinical chemistry traits. Although feed efficiency during the first 3 wk of treatment with bPL was improved by 14% (P < .05), feed efficiency for the full 6-wk treatment period did not differ from that of control lambs. Responsiveness to bPL may have been attenuated by high titer antibodies present after 2 wk of treatment. However, bPL also did not influence growth-related clinical chemistry traits during short-term (7 d) treatment, strongly suggesting that bPL was ineffective in finishing lambs at the doses tested. In contrast, bST improved 6-wk feed efficiency by an average of 17% (P < .05) and decreased feed intake by an average of 12% (P < .05). In addition, measures of carcass composition including longissimus muscle area, specific gravity of the rack, kidney and pelvic fat, and fat thickness demonstrated that bST, but not bPL, treatment decreased carcass fatness and increased carcass leanness. Treatment with bST, but not with bPL, affected IGF-I, insulin, glucose, and urea nitrogen in a dose-related manner. Thus, daily injections of bPL did not affect either performance or carcass quality, whereas performance and carcass responses of finishing lambs to bST were consistent with those reported by others.

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