Peripheral and cerebral asymmetries in the rat

Nicholas P. LaMendola, Thomas G Bever

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rats learn a novel foraging pattern better with their right-side whiskers than with their left-side whiskers. They also learn better with the left cerebral hemisphere than with the right hemisphere. Rotating an already learned maze relative to the external environment most strongly reduces right-whisker performance; starting an already learned maze at a different location most strongly reduces left-whisker performance. These results suggest that the right-periphery-left-hemisphere system accesses a map-like representation of the foraging problem, whereas the left-periphery-right- hemisphere system accesses a rote path. Thus, as in humans, functional asymmetries in rats can be elicited by both peripheral and cortical manipulation, and each hemisphere makes qualitatively distinct contributions to a complex natural behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)483-486
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume278
Issue number5337
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 17 1997

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Peripheral and cerebral asymmetries in the rat. / LaMendola, Nicholas P.; Bever, Thomas G.

In: Science, Vol. 278, No. 5337, 17.10.1997, p. 483-486.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

LaMendola, Nicholas P. ; Bever, Thomas G. / Peripheral and cerebral asymmetries in the rat. In: Science. 1997 ; Vol. 278, No. 5337. pp. 483-486.
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