Peripheral detection for abrupt onset stimuli presented via head-worn display

Michael Pascale, Penelope Sanderson, David Liu, Ismail Mohamed, Nicola Stigter, Robert G Loeb

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Head-worn displays have the potential to assist professionals in a wide variety of contexts by providing heads-up and hands-off information in real-time. For instance, nurses may be able to use head-worn displays to maintain peripheral awareness of the well-being of multiple patients while away from the nurses' station and the patients' beds. However, little is known about the advantages and disadvantages of head-worn displays in such contexts. In fact, many studies have shown that head-worn displays can lead to detriments in attention and visual performance. In three experiments, we tested people's ability to detect simple, abrupt onset stimuli in peripheral vision when using a traditional computer monitor or Google Glass. When using Google Glass, participants were significantly less likely to detect peripheral events. These data indicate that monocular optical see-through head-worn displays can make it harder to see peripheral stimuli. Stimuli need to be developed for head-worn displays that preserve their benefits for mobile users, while overcoming some of their disadvantages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages1326-1330
Number of pages5
Volume2015-January
ISBN (Electronic)9780945289470
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Event59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014 - Los Angeles, United States
Duration: Oct 26 2015Oct 30 2015

Other

Other59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles
Period10/26/1510/30/15

Fingerprint

stimulus
Display devices
search engine
nurse
well-being
Computer monitors
Computer peripheral equipment
Glass
event
experiment
ability
performance
Experiments
time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Pascale, M., Sanderson, P., Liu, D., Mohamed, I., Stigter, N., & Loeb, R. G. (2015). Peripheral detection for abrupt onset stimuli presented via head-worn display. In 2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015 (Vol. 2015-January, pp. 1326-1330). Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931215591218

Peripheral detection for abrupt onset stimuli presented via head-worn display. / Pascale, Michael; Sanderson, Penelope; Liu, David; Mohamed, Ismail; Stigter, Nicola; Loeb, Robert G.

2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015. Vol. 2015-January Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., 2015. p. 1326-1330.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Pascale, M, Sanderson, P, Liu, D, Mohamed, I, Stigter, N & Loeb, RG 2015, Peripheral detection for abrupt onset stimuli presented via head-worn display. in 2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015. vol. 2015-January, Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., pp. 1326-1330, 59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014, Los Angeles, United States, 10/26/15. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931215591218
Pascale M, Sanderson P, Liu D, Mohamed I, Stigter N, Loeb RG. Peripheral detection for abrupt onset stimuli presented via head-worn display. In 2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015. Vol. 2015-January. Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc. 2015. p. 1326-1330 https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931215591218
Pascale, Michael ; Sanderson, Penelope ; Liu, David ; Mohamed, Ismail ; Stigter, Nicola ; Loeb, Robert G. / Peripheral detection for abrupt onset stimuli presented via head-worn display. 2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015. Vol. 2015-January Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., 2015. pp. 1326-1330
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