Perspective Piece Autochthonous Chagas Disease in the United States: How Are People Getting Infected?

Norman L. Beatty, Stephen A. Klotz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the United States, Chagas disease is diagnosed in less than 1% of the estimated > 300,000 people who have the disease. However, the actual prevalence remains unknown, and these estimates may be wide of the mark (too high or too low). The greater part of those living with the disease acquired the infection in an endemic region of Latin America, but autochthonous transmission in the United States is increasingly being described. These cases are considered rare, and the transmission routes are largely unknown. Although triatomines or “kissing bugs” harbor Trypanosoma cruzi in North America, most autochthonous cases are presumed rather than confirmed exposures to naturally infected kissing bugs. Public knowledge of Chagas is growing, and efforts are underway to provide greater awareness, but what are the risk factors for human transmission of Chagas disease in the United States?.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)967-969
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume103
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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