Pharmaceuticals and EDCS in the US water industry - An update

Erin M. Snyder, Richard C. Pleus, Shane A Snyder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The detection of smaller concentrations of some endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) and pharmaceuticals in water is discussed. These emerging contaminants appear to be ubiquitous in municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents and in surface waters influenced by effluents, including source waters for drinking water treatment plants. EDCs are agents that interfere with the functioning of natural hormones in the body. Pharmaceuticals found in surface waters include prescription and nonprescription human and veterinary drugs. The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) developed the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program to identify screening methods and toxicity testing strategies that can be used to identify chemicals as EDC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-36
Number of pages5
JournalJournal - American Water Works Association
Volume97
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Endocrine Disruptors
water industry
Drug products
drug
Surface waters
Water
Effluents
Screening
Veterinary Drugs
Pharmaceutical Preparations
effluent
surface water
Industry
Water treatment plants
endocrine disruptor
Hormones
Environmental Protection Agency
Potable water
Drinking Water
Wastewater treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Civil and Structural Engineering

Cite this

Pharmaceuticals and EDCS in the US water industry - An update. / Snyder, Erin M.; Pleus, Richard C.; Snyder, Shane A.

In: Journal - American Water Works Association, Vol. 97, No. 11, 11.2005, p. 32-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Snyder, Erin M. ; Pleus, Richard C. ; Snyder, Shane A. / Pharmaceuticals and EDCS in the US water industry - An update. In: Journal - American Water Works Association. 2005 ; Vol. 97, No. 11. pp. 32-36.
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