Pharmacy students' ability to identify potential drug-drug interactions

Kim R. Saverno, Daniel C Malone, John Kurowsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To evaluate the ability of third- and fourth-year pharmacy students to identify clinically significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) Methods. A questionnaire designed to measure DDI knowledge was disseminated to fourth-year pharmacy students in a school of pharmacy. A second questionnaire was distributed to third-year pharmacy students in 2 schools of pharmacy (schools A and B) and re-administered to students in 1 of the schools 1 year later. Results. Class of 2005 fourth-year pharmacy students correctly categorized an average of 52% 6 13% DDI pairs on the first questionnaire. Third-year pharmacy students at schools A and B correctly categorized an average of 61% 6 18% and 66% 6 15% of DDI pairs, respectively. The average percentage of correct responses for fourth-year students from the class of 2007 was 65% (6 17%). Conclusion. Pharmacy students' ability to identify important DDIs is far from optimal, even after completing experiential requirements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number27
JournalAmerican Journal of Pharmaceutical Education
Volume73
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Pharmacy Students
Drug Interactions
drug
ability
interaction
Pharmacy Schools
Pharmaceutical Preparations
student
school
Students
questionnaire
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Drug interaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Pharmacy students' ability to identify potential drug-drug interactions. / Saverno, Kim R.; Malone, Daniel C; Kurowsky, John.

In: American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, Vol. 73, No. 2, 27, 2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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