Photonic integrated circuits: Research curiosity or packaging common sense?

Thomas L Koch, Uziel Koren

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The potential of photonic integrated circuits (PICs) for meeting the requirements of high-connectivity optical communication architectures (where there is a variety of cascaded, interconnected optical devices at each station) at a reasonable cost is discussed. PICs refer to the monolithic (single-substrate) integration of optically interconnected guided-wave devices. PIC technology replaces the separate, sequential alignment of single-mode fiber interconnections between the discrete devices with lithographically produced single-crystal waveguides, eliminating the cost of individual alignments through a wafer-scale batch process and providing a lower-loss connection, a low-reflection connection, and a very robust, small package. To illustrate the application of PIC techniques, a balanced heterodyne receiver, a wavelength-division-multiplexing source, and tapered waveguide output couplers are considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIEEE LCS Magazine
Pages50-56
Number of pages7
Volume1
Edition4
StatePublished - Nov 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Photonics
Integrated circuits
Packaging
Waveguides
Guided electromagnetic wave propagation
Single mode fibers
Optical communication
Optical devices
Wavelength division multiplexing
Costs
Single crystals
Substrates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Koch, T. L., & Koren, U. (1990). Photonic integrated circuits: Research curiosity or packaging common sense? In IEEE LCS Magazine (4 ed., Vol. 1, pp. 50-56)

Photonic integrated circuits : Research curiosity or packaging common sense? / Koch, Thomas L; Koren, Uziel.

IEEE LCS Magazine. Vol. 1 4. ed. 1990. p. 50-56.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Koch, TL & Koren, U 1990, Photonic integrated circuits: Research curiosity or packaging common sense? in IEEE LCS Magazine. 4 edn, vol. 1, pp. 50-56.
Koch TL, Koren U. Photonic integrated circuits: Research curiosity or packaging common sense? In IEEE LCS Magazine. 4 ed. Vol. 1. 1990. p. 50-56
Koch, Thomas L ; Koren, Uziel. / Photonic integrated circuits : Research curiosity or packaging common sense?. IEEE LCS Magazine. Vol. 1 4. ed. 1990. pp. 50-56
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