Photothermal coagulation of blood vessels: A comparison of high-speed optical coherence tomography and numerical modelling

Jennifer K Barton, Andrew Rollins, Siavash Yazdanfar, T. Joshua Pfefer, Volker Westphal, Joseph A. Izatt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Optical-thermal models that can accurately predict temperature rise and damage in blood vessels and surrounding tissue may be used to improve the treatment of vascular disorders. Verification of these models has been hampered by the lack of time- and depth-resolved experimental data. In this preliminary study, an optical coherence tomography system operating at 4-30 frames per second was used to visualize laser irradiation of cutaneous (hamster dorsal skin flap) blood vessels. An argon laser was utilized with the following parameters: pulse duration 0.1-2.0 s, spot size 0.1-1.0 mm, power 100-400 mW. Video microscopy images were obtained before and after irradiations, and opticalthermal modelling was performed on two irradiation cases. Time-resolved optical coherence tomography and still images were compared with predictions of temperature rise and damage using Monte Carlo and finite difference techniques. In general, predicted damage agreed with the actual blood vessel and surrounding tissue coagulation seen in images. However, limitations of current optical-thermal models were identified, such as the inability to model the dynamic changes in blood vessel diameter that were seen in the optical coherence tomography images.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1665-1678
Number of pages14
JournalPhysics in Medicine and Biology
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Optical tomography
blood vessels
Optical Coherence Tomography
Blood vessels
coagulation
Coagulation
Blood Vessels
tomography
high speed
damage
irradiation
Irradiation
Tissue
Argon lasers
Lasers
argon lasers
Hot Temperature
hamsters
Laser beam effects
Video Microscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Photothermal coagulation of blood vessels : A comparison of high-speed optical coherence tomography and numerical modelling. / Barton, Jennifer K; Rollins, Andrew; Yazdanfar, Siavash; Pfefer, T. Joshua; Westphal, Volker; Izatt, Joseph A.

In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, Vol. 46, No. 6, 2001, p. 1665-1678.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barton, Jennifer K ; Rollins, Andrew ; Yazdanfar, Siavash ; Pfefer, T. Joshua ; Westphal, Volker ; Izatt, Joseph A. / Photothermal coagulation of blood vessels : A comparison of high-speed optical coherence tomography and numerical modelling. In: Physics in Medicine and Biology. 2001 ; Vol. 46, No. 6. pp. 1665-1678.
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