Physical planning thought. Retrospect and prospect

Gary E Pivo, Cliff Ellis, Michael Leaf, Gerald Magutu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

City planning scholars recently have been calling for greater attention by schools of city and regional planning to the intellectual field of physical planning. This article responds by offering a retrospective of the physical planning field and a future research agenda. Both are organized around five perennial questions which, it is argued, have always been at the core of the field. The questions address the forces that shape physical development, the evolving urban form, possible and desirable physical futures, the impacts of development, and institutional means for guiding urban growth. The field has grown to include urban design and environmental planning. This is reflected in a current description of the 'physical city' which includes overall form, topography, buildings, infrastructure, transportation, utilities, open space, density, climate, vegetation, aesthetic quality, and urban design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-70
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Architectural and Planning Research
Volume7
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Urban planning
urban design
Planning
planning
Urban growth
Regional planning
physical development
transportation infrastructure
environmental planning
regional planning
open space
urban growth
esthetics
Topography
building
aesthetics
climate
topography
infrastructure
geography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Physical planning thought. Retrospect and prospect. / Pivo, Gary E; Ellis, Cliff; Leaf, Michael; Magutu, Gerald.

In: Journal of Architectural and Planning Research, Vol. 7, No. 1, 03.1990, p. 53-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pivo, Gary E ; Ellis, Cliff ; Leaf, Michael ; Magutu, Gerald. / Physical planning thought. Retrospect and prospect. In: Journal of Architectural and Planning Research. 1990 ; Vol. 7, No. 1. pp. 53-70.
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