Physiological Adaptations in Adipose Tissue of Brahman vs Angus Heifers

J. E. Sprinkle, H. S. Hansard, B. G. Warrington, J. W. Holloway, G. Wu, S. B. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nonpregnant yearling Brahman (n = 12) and Angus (n = 12) heifers were equally allocated to two dietary treatments in a replicated study to examine responses in lipid metabolism to nutritional treatments consisting of a moderate energy diet (2.0 Meal ME/kg) fed at maintenance and a 2.5 × maintenance high-energy diet (2.4 Meal ME/kg) fed for 30 d. In vitro lipogenesis and the activities of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) were determined in perianal subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies at the start and end of the trial. At the start of the trial, breeds had similar (P > 10) rates of lipogenesis and LPL activity. Brahman had greater (P < .05) HSL activity than Angus at the start of the trial and tended (P < .07) to have greater HSL activity at the end. Diet did not influence (P > .10) HSL activity. Heifers on the high-energy, higher-intake diet had greater lipogenesis (P < .001) and LPL activity (P < .01) than those on the moderate-energy diet. Inclusion of body condition score (BCS) nested within breed as a covariate explained breed differences for lipogenesis (P < .05). Thus, by including the covariate, the two breeds had similar (P > .10) rates of lipogenesis at the end of the trial. When adjusted for BCS nested within breed, Brahman had greater (P < .05) LPL activity than Angus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)743-749
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume76
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Beef Cattle
  • Breeds
  • Lipogenesis
  • Lipoproteins
  • Triacylglycerol Lipase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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