Picturing the Iraq war: Constructing the image of war in the British and US press

Shahira S Fahmy, Daekyung Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study reports the findings of a visual content analysis of 1305 Iraq War-related photographs appearing in the US press, represented by The New York Times, and the British press, represented by The Guardian. Overall, the two newspapers visually portrayed the Iraq War differently. Further, the more spontaneous or direct coverage of actually ongoing events were rare at best, and were exclusively found in photographs that ran in The Guardian. One aspect of the pictorial coverage, however, seems unprecedented: the emphasis on the human cost of the war focusing on Iraqi civilians. Moreover, images of loss of military life were scarce but still available.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)443-462
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Communication Gazette
Volume70
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008

Fingerprint

Iraq
coverage
Costs
content analysis
newspaper
Military
event
costs

Keywords

  • British press
  • Framing
  • Iraq war
  • Photojournalism
  • US press
  • Visual reporting
  • War coverage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Picturing the Iraq war : Constructing the image of war in the British and US press. / Fahmy, Shahira S; Kim, Daekyung.

In: International Communication Gazette, Vol. 70, No. 6, 12.2008, p. 443-462.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b846d0bb50dd4d86b90d4b2d12d05385,
title = "Picturing the Iraq war: Constructing the image of war in the British and US press",
abstract = "This study reports the findings of a visual content analysis of 1305 Iraq War-related photographs appearing in the US press, represented by The New York Times, and the British press, represented by The Guardian. Overall, the two newspapers visually portrayed the Iraq War differently. Further, the more spontaneous or direct coverage of actually ongoing events were rare at best, and were exclusively found in photographs that ran in The Guardian. One aspect of the pictorial coverage, however, seems unprecedented: the emphasis on the human cost of the war focusing on Iraqi civilians. Moreover, images of loss of military life were scarce but still available.",
keywords = "British press, Framing, Iraq war, Photojournalism, US press, Visual reporting, War coverage",
author = "Fahmy, {Shahira S} and Daekyung Kim",
year = "2008",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1177/1748048508096142",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "70",
pages = "443--462",
journal = "International Communication Gazette",
issn = "1748-0485",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Picturing the Iraq war

T2 - Constructing the image of war in the British and US press

AU - Fahmy, Shahira S

AU - Kim, Daekyung

PY - 2008/12

Y1 - 2008/12

N2 - This study reports the findings of a visual content analysis of 1305 Iraq War-related photographs appearing in the US press, represented by The New York Times, and the British press, represented by The Guardian. Overall, the two newspapers visually portrayed the Iraq War differently. Further, the more spontaneous or direct coverage of actually ongoing events were rare at best, and were exclusively found in photographs that ran in The Guardian. One aspect of the pictorial coverage, however, seems unprecedented: the emphasis on the human cost of the war focusing on Iraqi civilians. Moreover, images of loss of military life were scarce but still available.

AB - This study reports the findings of a visual content analysis of 1305 Iraq War-related photographs appearing in the US press, represented by The New York Times, and the British press, represented by The Guardian. Overall, the two newspapers visually portrayed the Iraq War differently. Further, the more spontaneous or direct coverage of actually ongoing events were rare at best, and were exclusively found in photographs that ran in The Guardian. One aspect of the pictorial coverage, however, seems unprecedented: the emphasis on the human cost of the war focusing on Iraqi civilians. Moreover, images of loss of military life were scarce but still available.

KW - British press

KW - Framing

KW - Iraq war

KW - Photojournalism

KW - US press

KW - Visual reporting

KW - War coverage

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=54949093932&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=54949093932&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1748048508096142

DO - 10.1177/1748048508096142

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:54949093932

VL - 70

SP - 443

EP - 462

JO - International Communication Gazette

JF - International Communication Gazette

SN - 1748-0485

IS - 6

ER -