Pipe wall damage detection by electromagnetic acoustic transducer generated guided waves in absence of defect signals

Milos Vasiljevic, Tribikram Kundu, Wolfgang Grill, Evgeny Twerdowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Most investigators emphasize the importance of detecting the reflected signal from the defect to determine if the pipe wall has any damage and to predict the damage location. However, often the small signal from the defect is hidden behind the other arriving wave modes and signal noise. To overcome the difficulties associated with the identification of the small defect signal in the time history plots, in this paper the time history is analyzed well after the arrival of the first defect signal, and after different wave modes have propagated multiple times through the pipe. It is shown that the defective pipe can be clearly identified by analyzing these late arriving diffuse ultrasonic signals. Multiple reflections and scattering of the propagating wave modes by the defect and pipe ends do not hamper the defect detection capability; on the contrary, it apparently stabilizes the signal and makes it easier to distinguish the defective pipe from the defect-free pipe. This paper also highlights difficulties associated with the interpretation of the recorded time histories due to mode conversion by the defect. The design of electro-magnetic acoustic transducers used to generate and receive the guided waves in the pipe is briefly described in the paper.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2591-2597
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume123
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 20 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

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