Plant-animal interactions affecting plant establishment and persistence on revegetated rangeland

Steve Archer, D. A. Pyke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Timing and site preparation are important in limiting belowground herbivory. Animals can serve as dispersal agents of seeds. Livestock dosed with desirable seeds can disperse them in their dung across the landscape, thereby creating patches of desirable plants. If revegetation sites will be grazed by livestock, then managers should choose plant species that tolerate rather than avoid grazing and should apply adequate management to establish and maintain plant populations. Seeds inoculated with mutualistic species such as mycorrhizae, nitrogen-fixing bacteria, or actinomycetes may enhance establishment, productivity, and nutrient quality of rangeland species while increasing rates of succession. -Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)558-565
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Range Management
Volume44
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

plant establishment
rangeland
rangelands
persistence
seed
animal
livestock
seeds
animals
nitrogen-fixing bacteria
site preparation
mycorrhiza
Actinobacteria
revegetation
land restoration
mycorrhizae
herbivory
managers
herbivores
grazing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Plant-animal interactions affecting plant establishment and persistence on revegetated rangeland. / Archer, Steve; Pyke, D. A.

In: Journal of Range Management, Vol. 44, No. 6, 1991, p. 558-565.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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