Plant extracts, spices, and essential oils inactivate Escherichia coli O157: H7 and reduce formation of potentially carcinogenic heterocyclic amines in cooked beef patties

Liliana Rounds, Cody M. Havens, Yelena Feinstein, Mendel Friedman, Sadhana Ravishankar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Meats need to be heated to inactivate foodborne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7. High-temperature treatment used to prepare well-done meats increases the formation of carcinogenic heterocyclic amines (HCAs). We evaluated the ability of plant extracts, spices, and essential oils to simultaneously inactivate E. coli O157:H7 and suppress HCA formation in heated hamburger patties. Ground beef with added antimicrobials was inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (10 7 CFU/g). Patties were cooked to reach 45 °C at the geometric center, flipped, and cooked for 5 min. Samples were then taken for microbiological and mass spectrometry analysis of HCAs. Some compounds were inhibitory only against E. coli or HCA formation, while some others inhibited both. Addition of 5% olive or apple skin extracts reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations to below the detection limit and by 1.6 log CFU/g, respectively. Similarly, 1% lemongrass oil reduced E. coli O157:H7 to below detection limits, while clove bud oil reduced the pathogen by 1.6 log CFU/g. The major heterocyclic amines 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) were concurrently reduced with the addition of olive extract by 79.5% and 84.3% and with apple extract by 76.1% and 82.1%, respectively. Similar results were observed with clove bud oil: MeIQx and PhIP were reduced by 35% and 52.1%, respectively. Addition of onion powder decreased formation of PhIP by 94.3%. These results suggest that edible natural plant compounds have the potential to prevent foodborne infections as well as carcinogenesis in humans consuming heat-processed meat products.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3792-3799
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume60
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 11 2012

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spice oils
heterocyclic amines
Beef
Spices
Escherichia coli O157
patties
Plant Extracts
Volatile Oils
plant extracts
Escherichia coli
Amines
essential oils
beef
Clove Oil
Meats
2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoxaline
cloves
Malus
Olea
oils

Keywords

  • Escherichia coli O157:H7
  • ground beef patties
  • heterocyclic amines
  • plant compounds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Plant extracts, spices, and essential oils inactivate Escherichia coli O157 : H7 and reduce formation of potentially carcinogenic heterocyclic amines in cooked beef patties. / Rounds, Liliana; Havens, Cody M.; Feinstein, Yelena; Friedman, Mendel; Ravishankar, Sadhana.

In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Vol. 60, No. 14, 11.04.2012, p. 3792-3799.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Meats need to be heated to inactivate foodborne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7. High-temperature treatment used to prepare well-done meats increases the formation of carcinogenic heterocyclic amines (HCAs). We evaluated the ability of plant extracts, spices, and essential oils to simultaneously inactivate E. coli O157:H7 and suppress HCA formation in heated hamburger patties. Ground beef with added antimicrobials was inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (10 7 CFU/g). Patties were cooked to reach 45 °C at the geometric center, flipped, and cooked for 5 min. Samples were then taken for microbiological and mass spectrometry analysis of HCAs. Some compounds were inhibitory only against E. coli or HCA formation, while some others inhibited both. Addition of 5{\%} olive or apple skin extracts reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations to below the detection limit and by 1.6 log CFU/g, respectively. Similarly, 1{\%} lemongrass oil reduced E. coli O157:H7 to below detection limits, while clove bud oil reduced the pathogen by 1.6 log CFU/g. The major heterocyclic amines 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) were concurrently reduced with the addition of olive extract by 79.5{\%} and 84.3{\%} and with apple extract by 76.1{\%} and 82.1{\%}, respectively. Similar results were observed with clove bud oil: MeIQx and PhIP were reduced by 35{\%} and 52.1{\%}, respectively. Addition of onion powder decreased formation of PhIP by 94.3{\%}. These results suggest that edible natural plant compounds have the potential to prevent foodborne infections as well as carcinogenesis in humans consuming heat-processed meat products.",
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