Plant part selection and evaluation of factors affecting analysis and recovery of nitrate in irrigated durum wheat tissue

T. C. Knowles, T. A. Doerge, M. J. Ottman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Periodic nitrate tissue tests are used to determine nitrogen (N) fertility status of a variety of crops. Data on the importance of plant part selection, sample handling techniques, grinding criteria and extraction conditions in NO3-N analysis of wheat tissue are essential if the procedure is to achieve widespread adoption and use. Detailed partitioning of field grown durum spring wheat (Triticum durum) plants at the Feekes 2 (3–4 leaf), 6 (joint) and 10 (boot) growth stages was conducted to document which plant part exhibits the greatest accumulation of NO3-N. Sample handling, fineness of tissue grinding, different tissue: extractant ratios and extraction times were examined to determine their effects on NO3-N recovery. Partitioning data confirmed previous findings which identified the basal stem between ground level and the seed prior to jointing and the 5 cm of stem just above ground level thereafter as the plant parts showing the greatest accumulation of NO3-N. Therefore, these plant parts have the greatest potential as indicators of the N nutritional status of durum spring wheat. Optimal recovery of tissue NO3-N was obtained when stem tissue was separated immediately in the field and dried within 8 hours of sampling, ground to pass a 0.55 mm mesh screen, and extracted for at least 30 minutes when using a sample size of 0.1000 g in conjunction with 25 ml of extractant (i.e. 1:250 plant tissue to extractant ratio).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)607-622
Number of pages16
JournalCommunications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis
Volume20
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Soil Science

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