Plasma growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor, insulin, and thyroid hormone association with body protein and fat accretion in steers undergoing compensatory gain after dietary energy restriction.

J. M. Hayden, J. E. Williams, Robert J Collier

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Abstract

Eighteen Chianina crossbred steers were used to examine the interrelationship between hormonal status and empty body protein (EBPRT) and fat (EBFAT) accretion during an 88-d controlled realimentation (REAL; DMI was adjusted weekly on an individual BW basis) period. Body composition was determined by monitoring endogenous whole-body 40[K]. At the end of restriction (REST) and on d 31 and 59 of REAL blood samples were taken and analyzed for concentrations of growth hormone (GH), IGF-I, IGF-II, insulin (INS), thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), reverse triiodothyronine (rT3), nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), glucose, and urea nitrogen. Depositions of EBPRT and EBFAT were decreased (P < .001) in REST (92 d) animals compared with nonrestricted (NR) controls. During REST, plasma levels of glucose, IGF-I, INS, T4, T3, and rT3 were decreased (P < .05); plasma urea nitrogen (PUN), NEFA, and GH levels were increased (P < .05), and IGF-II concentrations were similar between REST and NR steers. A transient compensatory response in BW gain and protein deposition occurred in repleted steers between d 35 and 62 of REAL. During this period, PUN levels markedly declined (P < .01) in REAL steers and glucose concentration increased (P < .01) to levels similar to those in NR controls. This response prevailed even though apparent digestible nutrients were decreased in repleted animals. During energy repletion, plasma levels of T4, T3, rT3, IGF-I, and INS were positively, and of GH was negatively, correlated with EBPRT and EBFAT gain in repleted animals. Unlike IGF-I, IGF-II was not correlated with compensatory body growth. These results suggest that compensating steers are more metabolically efficient; rapid body tissue gain occurs during a period of reduced nutrient digestibility. Additionally, plasma levels of IGF-I, GH, INS, and thyroid hormones, but not of IGF-II, are markedly affected by alteration of energy intake and are highly correlated with empty body gain and protein deposition in compensating late-maturing steers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3327-3338
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Animal Science
Volume71
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

body protein
somatomedins
Somatomedins
thyroid hormones
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Thyroid Hormones
Insulin-Like Growth Factor II
somatotropin
body fat
Growth Hormone
triiodothyronine
insulin-like growth factor II
insulin-like growth factor I
insulin
Fats
Insulin
L-thyroxine
energy
Urea
urea nitrogen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

@article{f55619f011454d49817f17075f58b12e,
title = "Plasma growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor, insulin, and thyroid hormone association with body protein and fat accretion in steers undergoing compensatory gain after dietary energy restriction.",
abstract = "Eighteen Chianina crossbred steers were used to examine the interrelationship between hormonal status and empty body protein (EBPRT) and fat (EBFAT) accretion during an 88-d controlled realimentation (REAL; DMI was adjusted weekly on an individual BW basis) period. Body composition was determined by monitoring endogenous whole-body 40[K]. At the end of restriction (REST) and on d 31 and 59 of REAL blood samples were taken and analyzed for concentrations of growth hormone (GH), IGF-I, IGF-II, insulin (INS), thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), reverse triiodothyronine (rT3), nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), glucose, and urea nitrogen. Depositions of EBPRT and EBFAT were decreased (P < .001) in REST (92 d) animals compared with nonrestricted (NR) controls. During REST, plasma levels of glucose, IGF-I, INS, T4, T3, and rT3 were decreased (P < .05); plasma urea nitrogen (PUN), NEFA, and GH levels were increased (P < .05), and IGF-II concentrations were similar between REST and NR steers. A transient compensatory response in BW gain and protein deposition occurred in repleted steers between d 35 and 62 of REAL. During this period, PUN levels markedly declined (P < .01) in REAL steers and glucose concentration increased (P < .01) to levels similar to those in NR controls. This response prevailed even though apparent digestible nutrients were decreased in repleted animals. During energy repletion, plasma levels of T4, T3, rT3, IGF-I, and INS were positively, and of GH was negatively, correlated with EBPRT and EBFAT gain in repleted animals. Unlike IGF-I, IGF-II was not correlated with compensatory body growth. These results suggest that compensating steers are more metabolically efficient; rapid body tissue gain occurs during a period of reduced nutrient digestibility. Additionally, plasma levels of IGF-I, GH, INS, and thyroid hormones, but not of IGF-II, are markedly affected by alteration of energy intake and are highly correlated with empty body gain and protein deposition in compensating late-maturing steers.",
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AU - Collier, Robert J

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N2 - Eighteen Chianina crossbred steers were used to examine the interrelationship between hormonal status and empty body protein (EBPRT) and fat (EBFAT) accretion during an 88-d controlled realimentation (REAL; DMI was adjusted weekly on an individual BW basis) period. Body composition was determined by monitoring endogenous whole-body 40[K]. At the end of restriction (REST) and on d 31 and 59 of REAL blood samples were taken and analyzed for concentrations of growth hormone (GH), IGF-I, IGF-II, insulin (INS), thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), reverse triiodothyronine (rT3), nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), glucose, and urea nitrogen. Depositions of EBPRT and EBFAT were decreased (P < .001) in REST (92 d) animals compared with nonrestricted (NR) controls. During REST, plasma levels of glucose, IGF-I, INS, T4, T3, and rT3 were decreased (P < .05); plasma urea nitrogen (PUN), NEFA, and GH levels were increased (P < .05), and IGF-II concentrations were similar between REST and NR steers. A transient compensatory response in BW gain and protein deposition occurred in repleted steers between d 35 and 62 of REAL. During this period, PUN levels markedly declined (P < .01) in REAL steers and glucose concentration increased (P < .01) to levels similar to those in NR controls. This response prevailed even though apparent digestible nutrients were decreased in repleted animals. During energy repletion, plasma levels of T4, T3, rT3, IGF-I, and INS were positively, and of GH was negatively, correlated with EBPRT and EBFAT gain in repleted animals. Unlike IGF-I, IGF-II was not correlated with compensatory body growth. These results suggest that compensating steers are more metabolically efficient; rapid body tissue gain occurs during a period of reduced nutrient digestibility. Additionally, plasma levels of IGF-I, GH, INS, and thyroid hormones, but not of IGF-II, are markedly affected by alteration of energy intake and are highly correlated with empty body gain and protein deposition in compensating late-maturing steers.

AB - Eighteen Chianina crossbred steers were used to examine the interrelationship between hormonal status and empty body protein (EBPRT) and fat (EBFAT) accretion during an 88-d controlled realimentation (REAL; DMI was adjusted weekly on an individual BW basis) period. Body composition was determined by monitoring endogenous whole-body 40[K]. At the end of restriction (REST) and on d 31 and 59 of REAL blood samples were taken and analyzed for concentrations of growth hormone (GH), IGF-I, IGF-II, insulin (INS), thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), reverse triiodothyronine (rT3), nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), glucose, and urea nitrogen. Depositions of EBPRT and EBFAT were decreased (P < .001) in REST (92 d) animals compared with nonrestricted (NR) controls. During REST, plasma levels of glucose, IGF-I, INS, T4, T3, and rT3 were decreased (P < .05); plasma urea nitrogen (PUN), NEFA, and GH levels were increased (P < .05), and IGF-II concentrations were similar between REST and NR steers. A transient compensatory response in BW gain and protein deposition occurred in repleted steers between d 35 and 62 of REAL. During this period, PUN levels markedly declined (P < .01) in REAL steers and glucose concentration increased (P < .01) to levels similar to those in NR controls. This response prevailed even though apparent digestible nutrients were decreased in repleted animals. During energy repletion, plasma levels of T4, T3, rT3, IGF-I, and INS were positively, and of GH was negatively, correlated with EBPRT and EBFAT gain in repleted animals. Unlike IGF-I, IGF-II was not correlated with compensatory body growth. These results suggest that compensating steers are more metabolically efficient; rapid body tissue gain occurs during a period of reduced nutrient digestibility. Additionally, plasma levels of IGF-I, GH, INS, and thyroid hormones, but not of IGF-II, are markedly affected by alteration of energy intake and are highly correlated with empty body gain and protein deposition in compensating late-maturing steers.

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