Plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and the risk of prostate cancer

Elizabeth T Jacobs, Anna R. Giuliano, María Elena Martínez, Bruce W. Hollis, Mary E. Reid, James R. Marshall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the US, prostate cancer (PCa) has the highest incidence rate of all cancers in males, with few known modifiable risk factors. Some studies support an association between the Vitamin D metabolites, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1α,25(OH)2D3) and/or 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D3), and prostate cancer, while others have yielded conflicting results. 1α,25(OH)2D3 has anti-proliferative and pro-differentiating effects in prostate cancer cell lines, and levels of circulating 25(OH)D3 may be important as PCa cells possess 1-α-hydroxylase activity. Using a nested case-control design, we evaluated whether plasma levels of 25(OH)D3 and 1α,25(OH)2D3 were associated with prostate cancer risk in participants from the Nutritional Prevention of Cancer (NPC) trial. With 83 cases and 166 matched controls, we calculated the adjusted odds ratios for increasing plasma levels of 25(OH)D3 and 1α,25(OH) 2D3. Compared to the lowest tertile of plasma 25(OH)D 3 levels, the adjusted odds ratios were 1.71 (0.68-4.34) and 0.75 (0.29-1.91); the corresponding odds ratios for 1α,25(OH)2D 3 were 1.44 (0.59-3.52) and 1.06 (0.42-2.66). Given the pivotal effects of the Vitamin D receptor on gene transcription, it is likely that the anti-carcinogenic effects of Vitamin D that have previously been described are related to the activity and expression of the Vitamin D receptor and should be investigated further.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)533-537
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Volume89-90
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2004

Fingerprint

Prostatic Neoplasms
Calcitriol Receptors
Plasmas
Vitamin D
Anticarcinogenic Agents
Odds Ratio
Transcription
Metabolites
Mixed Function Oxygenases
Genes
Cells
Neoplasms
1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D
25-hydroxyvitamin D
Cell Line
Incidence

Keywords

  • 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D
  • 25-Hydroxyvitamin D
  • Prostate cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and the risk of prostate cancer. / Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Giuliano, Anna R.; Martínez, María Elena; Hollis, Bruce W.; Reid, Mary E.; Marshall, James R.

In: Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Vol. 89-90, 05.2004, p. 533-537.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jacobs, Elizabeth T ; Giuliano, Anna R. ; Martínez, María Elena ; Hollis, Bruce W. ; Reid, Mary E. ; Marshall, James R. / Plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and the risk of prostate cancer. In: Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 2004 ; Vol. 89-90. pp. 533-537.
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