Pleistocene-modern deposits of the Lake Tanganyika Rift Basin, East Africa: a modern analog for lacustrine source rocks and reservoirs

J. J. Tiercelin, A. S. Cohen, M. J. Soreghan, K. E. Lezzar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Bottom sediments of the largest lake of the East African Rift system, Lake Tanganyika (length 650 km; maximum depth 1470 m; volume 18 800 km3) were extensively studied between 1983 and 1986 using a wide range of methods such as reflection seismology, piston coring, and dredging. Interpretation of multifold reflection seismic profiles collected by Project PROBE suggests up to 4 km of sediment has accumulated within local depocenters. In addition, seismic profiles exhibit several seismic discontinuities and associated sequences, interpreted to have resulted from large-scale, temporal changes in local tectonics and/or climate. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-59
Number of pages23
JournalSEPM Core Workshop
Volume19
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Pleistocene-modern deposits of the Lake Tanganyika Rift Basin, East Africa: a modern analog for lacustrine source rocks and reservoirs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this