Pleistocene-modern deposits of the Lake Tanganyika Rift Basin, East Africa: a modern analog for lacustrine source rocks and reservoirs

J. J. Tiercelin, Andrew Cohen, M. J. Soreghan, K. E. Lezzar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bottom sediments of the largest lake of the East African Rift system, Lake Tanganyika (length 650 km; maximum depth 1470 m; volume 18 800 km3) were extensively studied between 1983 and 1986 using a wide range of methods such as reflection seismology, piston coring, and dredging. Interpretation of multifold reflection seismic profiles collected by Project PROBE suggests up to 4 km of sediment has accumulated within local depocenters. In addition, seismic profiles exhibit several seismic discontinuities and associated sequences, interpreted to have resulted from large-scale, temporal changes in local tectonics and/or climate. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSEPM Core Workshop
Pages37-59
Number of pages23
Volume19
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

source rock
Pleistocene
depocenter
lake
seismology
dredging
basin
sediment
seismic reflection
discontinuity
tectonics
climate
East Africa
method
project

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Tiercelin, J. J., Cohen, A., Soreghan, M. J., & Lezzar, K. E. (1994). Pleistocene-modern deposits of the Lake Tanganyika Rift Basin, East Africa: a modern analog for lacustrine source rocks and reservoirs. In SEPM Core Workshop (Vol. 19, pp. 37-59)

Pleistocene-modern deposits of the Lake Tanganyika Rift Basin, East Africa : a modern analog for lacustrine source rocks and reservoirs. / Tiercelin, J. J.; Cohen, Andrew; Soreghan, M. J.; Lezzar, K. E.

SEPM Core Workshop. Vol. 19 1994. p. 37-59.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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