Population structure in the endangered Mauna Loa silversword, Argyroxiphium kauense (asteraceae), and its bearing on reintroduction

E. A. Friar, D. L. Boose, T. Ladoux, E. H. Roalson, Robert H Robichaux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reintroduction of populations of endangered species is a challenging task, involving a number of environmental, demographic and genetic factors. Genetic parameters of interest include historical patterns of genetic structure and gene flow. Care must be taken during reintroduction to balance the contrasting risks of inbreeding and outbreeding depression. The Mauna Loa silversword, Argyroxiphium kauense, has experienced a severe decline in population size and distribution in the recent past. Currently, three populations with a total of fewer than 1000 individuals remain. We measured genetic variation within and among the remnant populations using seven microsatellite loci. We found significant genetic variation remaining within all populations, probably related to the recent nature of the population impact, the longevity of the plants, and their apparent self-incompatibility. We also found significant genetic differentiation among the populations, reinforcing previous observations of ecological and morphological differentiation. With respect to reintroduction, the results suggest that, in the absence of additional data to the contrary, inbreeding depression may not be a substantial risk as long as propagules for the founding of new populations are adequately sampled from within each source population before additional inbreeding takes place. The results further suggest that if mixing of propagules from different source populations is not required to increase within-population genetic variation in the reintroduced populations, it may best be avoided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1657-1663
Number of pages7
JournalMolecular Ecology
Volume10
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Argyroxiphium
Bearings (structural)
Loa
Asteraceae
reintroduction
population structure
genetic variation
inbreeding
Microsatellite Repeats
Population
self incompatibility
inbreeding depression
Genes
population distribution
endangered species
genetic differentiation
genetic structure
population genetics
gene flow
population size

Keywords

  • Conservation genetics
  • Genetic distance
  • Genetic variation
  • Microsatellites
  • Reintroduction
  • Silverswords

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Population structure in the endangered Mauna Loa silversword, Argyroxiphium kauense (asteraceae), and its bearing on reintroduction. / Friar, E. A.; Boose, D. L.; Ladoux, T.; Roalson, E. H.; Robichaux, Robert H.

In: Molecular Ecology, Vol. 10, No. 7, 2001, p. 1657-1663.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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