Power and assessment: A genealogical analysis of the CLASS

Sonya Gaches, Diana Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The CLASS (classroom assessment scoring system) has become integrally linked with quality rating and improvement systems (QRIS) throughout the United States and other international locations. This relationship reinforces the neoliberal consumer-based perspectives of quality and devalues localized perspectives. This article challenges the notion of assessing quality in this manner and provides a genealogical analysis of the literature supporting the CLASS. The analysis focuses on three specific aspects of the CLASS research literature: the type of research used, how school success is defined, and the use of attachment theory in teacher–child relationships. The article also proposes further areas of study and analysis regarding the cultural appropriateness and international use of the assessment as well as questioning the line between research and marketing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-142
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Curriculum and Pedagogy
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 4 2017
Externally publishedYes

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classroom
school success
systems research
marketing
rating
literature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Power and assessment : A genealogical analysis of the CLASS. / Gaches, Sonya; Hill, Diana.

In: Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, Vol. 14, No. 2, 04.05.2017, p. 125-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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