Power decreases trust in social exchange

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

How does lacking vs. possessing power in a social exchange affect people's trust in their exchange partner? An answer to this question has broad implications for a number of exchange settings in which dependence plays an important role. Here, we report on a series of experiments in which we manipulated participants' power position in terms of structural dependence and observed their trust perceptions and behaviors. Over a variety of different experimental paradigms and measures, we find that more powerful actors place less trust in others than less powerful actors do. Our results contradict predictions by rational actor models, which assume that low-power individuals are able to anticipate that a more powerful exchange partner will place little value on the relationship with them, thus tends to behave opportunistically, and consequently cannot be trusted. Conversely, our results support predictions by motivated cognition theory, which posits that lowpower individuals want their exchange partner to be trustworthy and then act according to that desire. Mediation analyses show that, consistent with the motivated cognition account, having low power increases individuals' hope and, in turn, their perceptions of their exchange partners' benevolence, which ultimately leads them to trust.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12950-12955
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume112
Issue number42
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 20 2015

Keywords

  • Dependence
  • Hope
  • Power
  • Social exchange
  • Trust

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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