Practitioners' perspectives on effective practices for Hispanic teenage pregnancy prevention

Stephen T Russell, Faye C H Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

CONTEXT: In the United States, the pregnancy rate and birthrate of Hispanic teenagers are higher than those of other races and ethnicities. Although recommendations for culturally appropriate pregnancy prevention programs are commonplace, little is known about how practitioners address such recommendations. METHODS: In individual interviews, 58 teenage pregnancy prevention practitioners who work primarily with Mexican American female teenagers from two regions in California were asked about their understanding of recommendations for best practices and discussed the strategies they have used and challenges they have faced in implementing the recommendations. Qualitative methods were used to categorize responses and identify themes. RESULTS: Practitioners indicated that knowledge and awareness of Hispanic culture are essential, as is commitment to teenagers and their needs. They regard activities that encourage educational and career achievement as critical program components, and view both male partners' and family members' involvement in programs as important but challenging. Furthermore, practitioners feel that the implicit program goals of continued education and female self-sufficiency are often at odds with traditional Hispanic cultural values. CONCLUSIONS: Practitioners have valuable insight into the reality of implementing culturally sensitive programs. Programs need to balance the often competing values and goals of prevention programs with those of Hispanic youth culture and experiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)142-149
Number of pages8
JournalPerspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2004
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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