Preceptor perceptions of pharmacy student team quality assurance projects

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. To assess preceptors' opinions of the impact of quality assurance projects. Methods. Students were given the opportunity to directly apply material learned in class in a "real world" environment by completing a quality assurance project in a community or health-system pharmacy. All preceptors (n = 38) were contacted via telephone and given the opportunity to respond to open-ended questions concerning their experience with student-team quality assurance projects. Results. Preceptors indicated the quality assurance projects benefited their practice sites by providing additional resources (53%, n = 19), decreased medication errors (22%, n = 8), and increased awareness of the importance of quality assurance (22%, n = 8). Ninety-four percent of respondents (n = 34) perceived the projects had a positive impact on patient care and 92% (n = 33) perceived a positive impact on themselves. Conclusions. Preceptors felt that quality assurance projects performed by pharmacy-student teams were beneficial to patient care, the practice site, and themselves. The quality assurance projects have broad applications and can be added to a medication safety class or to the introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) sequence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number47
JournalAmerican Journal of Pharmaceutical Education
Volume73
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Pharmacy Students
quality assurance
Patient Care
Community Health Planning
Students
Medication Errors
Telephone
student
Safety
patient care
medication
telephone
experience
Surveys and Questionnaires
health
resources

Keywords

  • Curriculum
  • Preceptor
  • Quality assurance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Education

Cite this

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title = "Preceptor perceptions of pharmacy student team quality assurance projects",
abstract = "Objectives. To assess preceptors' opinions of the impact of quality assurance projects. Methods. Students were given the opportunity to directly apply material learned in class in a {"}real world{"} environment by completing a quality assurance project in a community or health-system pharmacy. All preceptors (n = 38) were contacted via telephone and given the opportunity to respond to open-ended questions concerning their experience with student-team quality assurance projects. Results. Preceptors indicated the quality assurance projects benefited their practice sites by providing additional resources (53{\%}, n = 19), decreased medication errors (22{\%}, n = 8), and increased awareness of the importance of quality assurance (22{\%}, n = 8). Ninety-four percent of respondents (n = 34) perceived the projects had a positive impact on patient care and 92{\%} (n = 33) perceived a positive impact on themselves. Conclusions. Preceptors felt that quality assurance projects performed by pharmacy-student teams were beneficial to patient care, the practice site, and themselves. The quality assurance projects have broad applications and can be added to a medication safety class or to the introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) sequence.",
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