Precipitative growth templated by a fluid jet

David A. Stone, Braddon Lewellyn, James C Baygents, Raymond E. Goldstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tubular growth by chemical precipitation at the interface between two fluids, a jet and its surroundings, underlies the development of such important structures as chimneys at hydrothermal vents. This growth is associated with strong thermal and/or solute gradients localized at those interfaces, and these gradients, in turn, often produce radial compositional stratification of the resulting tube wall. A fundamental question underlying these processes is how the interplay between diffusion, advection, and precipitation determines the elongation rate of the tubes. Here we report experimental and theoretical results that reveal a regime in which there exists a new scaling law for tube growth. The model system studied consists of a jet of aqueous ammonia injected into a ferrous sulfate solution, precipitating iron hydroxides with varying oxidation states at the jet boundary. Despite the complex chemistry and dynamics underlying the precipitation, the tube growth exhibits a strikingly simple scaling form, with characteristic lengths and times increasing linearly with the mean velocity of the jet. These observations follow from a kinetic model of advection-dominated flows.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10916-10919
Number of pages4
JournalLangmuir
Volume21
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 22 2005

Fingerprint

fluid jets
tubes
ferrous sulfate
Fluids
Advection
advection
jet boundaries
Hydroxides
chimneys
gradients
Chimneys
Vents
Scaling laws
vents
stratification
Ammonia
scaling laws
elongation
hydroxides
ammonia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Stone, D. A., Lewellyn, B., Baygents, J. C., & Goldstein, R. E. (2005). Precipitative growth templated by a fluid jet. Langmuir, 21(24), 10916-10919. https://doi.org/10.1021/la052064z

Precipitative growth templated by a fluid jet. / Stone, David A.; Lewellyn, Braddon; Baygents, James C; Goldstein, Raymond E.

In: Langmuir, Vol. 21, No. 24, 22.11.2005, p. 10916-10919.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stone, DA, Lewellyn, B, Baygents, JC & Goldstein, RE 2005, 'Precipitative growth templated by a fluid jet', Langmuir, vol. 21, no. 24, pp. 10916-10919. https://doi.org/10.1021/la052064z
Stone DA, Lewellyn B, Baygents JC, Goldstein RE. Precipitative growth templated by a fluid jet. Langmuir. 2005 Nov 22;21(24):10916-10919. https://doi.org/10.1021/la052064z
Stone, David A. ; Lewellyn, Braddon ; Baygents, James C ; Goldstein, Raymond E. / Precipitative growth templated by a fluid jet. In: Langmuir. 2005 ; Vol. 21, No. 24. pp. 10916-10919.
@article{875505b9d63e4d469f2a4a790742c98e,
title = "Precipitative growth templated by a fluid jet",
abstract = "Tubular growth by chemical precipitation at the interface between two fluids, a jet and its surroundings, underlies the development of such important structures as chimneys at hydrothermal vents. This growth is associated with strong thermal and/or solute gradients localized at those interfaces, and these gradients, in turn, often produce radial compositional stratification of the resulting tube wall. A fundamental question underlying these processes is how the interplay between diffusion, advection, and precipitation determines the elongation rate of the tubes. Here we report experimental and theoretical results that reveal a regime in which there exists a new scaling law for tube growth. The model system studied consists of a jet of aqueous ammonia injected into a ferrous sulfate solution, precipitating iron hydroxides with varying oxidation states at the jet boundary. Despite the complex chemistry and dynamics underlying the precipitation, the tube growth exhibits a strikingly simple scaling form, with characteristic lengths and times increasing linearly with the mean velocity of the jet. These observations follow from a kinetic model of advection-dominated flows.",
author = "Stone, {David A.} and Braddon Lewellyn and Baygents, {James C} and Goldstein, {Raymond E.}",
year = "2005",
month = "11",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1021/la052064z",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "10916--10919",
journal = "Langmuir",
issn = "0743-7463",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "24",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Precipitative growth templated by a fluid jet

AU - Stone, David A.

AU - Lewellyn, Braddon

AU - Baygents, James C

AU - Goldstein, Raymond E.

PY - 2005/11/22

Y1 - 2005/11/22

N2 - Tubular growth by chemical precipitation at the interface between two fluids, a jet and its surroundings, underlies the development of such important structures as chimneys at hydrothermal vents. This growth is associated with strong thermal and/or solute gradients localized at those interfaces, and these gradients, in turn, often produce radial compositional stratification of the resulting tube wall. A fundamental question underlying these processes is how the interplay between diffusion, advection, and precipitation determines the elongation rate of the tubes. Here we report experimental and theoretical results that reveal a regime in which there exists a new scaling law for tube growth. The model system studied consists of a jet of aqueous ammonia injected into a ferrous sulfate solution, precipitating iron hydroxides with varying oxidation states at the jet boundary. Despite the complex chemistry and dynamics underlying the precipitation, the tube growth exhibits a strikingly simple scaling form, with characteristic lengths and times increasing linearly with the mean velocity of the jet. These observations follow from a kinetic model of advection-dominated flows.

AB - Tubular growth by chemical precipitation at the interface between two fluids, a jet and its surroundings, underlies the development of such important structures as chimneys at hydrothermal vents. This growth is associated with strong thermal and/or solute gradients localized at those interfaces, and these gradients, in turn, often produce radial compositional stratification of the resulting tube wall. A fundamental question underlying these processes is how the interplay between diffusion, advection, and precipitation determines the elongation rate of the tubes. Here we report experimental and theoretical results that reveal a regime in which there exists a new scaling law for tube growth. The model system studied consists of a jet of aqueous ammonia injected into a ferrous sulfate solution, precipitating iron hydroxides with varying oxidation states at the jet boundary. Despite the complex chemistry and dynamics underlying the precipitation, the tube growth exhibits a strikingly simple scaling form, with characteristic lengths and times increasing linearly with the mean velocity of the jet. These observations follow from a kinetic model of advection-dominated flows.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=28844498983&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=28844498983&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/la052064z

DO - 10.1021/la052064z

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 10916

EP - 10919

JO - Langmuir

JF - Langmuir

SN - 0743-7463

IS - 24

ER -