Predicting spring moth emergence in the pink bollworm (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae): Implications for managing resistance to transgenic cotton

Yves Carriere, Christa Ellers-Kirk, Brent Pedersen, Shirley Haller, Larry Antilla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cultural control methods have been central in the southwestern United States for reducing pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders), damage to cotton. Nevertheless, it is not clear at present how such methods could be integrated within the novel pest management framework allowed by introduction of cotton producing a toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) for pink bollworm control. Using statewide pheromone trapping and climatic data in conjunction with deterministic simulation models, we investigated whether manipulation of cotton planting date and use of other cultural control methods could represent valuable tactics for control of the pink bollworm in Arizona. Accumulation of heat units from one January accurately predicted the rate of pink bollworm emergence from diapause in 15 cotton-producing regions. Significant variation in rate of emergence from diapause was present among regions, with earlier emergence at higher altitudes. Most adults emerge from diapause too early to reproduce successfully on cotton, a phenomenon known as suicidal emergence. A method for prediction of the fraction of suicidal emergence resulting from adoption of a given cotton planting date is presented. Results from simulation models suggest that manipulation of planting date and implementation of other control cultural methods reduce the rate of application of insecticides and delay the evolution of resistance to Bt cotton in the pink bollworm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1012-1021
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Economic Entomology
Volume94
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 2001

Fingerprint

Pectinophora gossypiella
Gelechiidae
moth
moths
eclosion
cotton
Lepidoptera
genetically modified organisms
diapause
planting date
cultural control
Bacillus thuringiensis
control methods
simulation models
Southwestern United States
Midwestern United States
pest control
plant cultural practices
pheromone
pest management

Keywords

  • Bacillus thuringiensis
  • Diapause
  • Heat units
  • Pectinophora gossypiella
  • Resistance management
  • Transgenic cotton

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

Cite this

Predicting spring moth emergence in the pink bollworm (Lepidoptera : Gelechiidae): Implications for managing resistance to transgenic cotton. / Carriere, Yves; Ellers-Kirk, Christa; Pedersen, Brent; Haller, Shirley; Antilla, Larry.

In: Journal of Economic Entomology, Vol. 94, No. 5, 10.2001, p. 1012-1021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carriere, Yves ; Ellers-Kirk, Christa ; Pedersen, Brent ; Haller, Shirley ; Antilla, Larry. / Predicting spring moth emergence in the pink bollworm (Lepidoptera : Gelechiidae): Implications for managing resistance to transgenic cotton. In: Journal of Economic Entomology. 2001 ; Vol. 94, No. 5. pp. 1012-1021.
@article{0fbc29ef4e7f4170ae6a03bc4de19f9a,
title = "Predicting spring moth emergence in the pink bollworm (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae): Implications for managing resistance to transgenic cotton",
abstract = "Cultural control methods have been central in the southwestern United States for reducing pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders), damage to cotton. Nevertheless, it is not clear at present how such methods could be integrated within the novel pest management framework allowed by introduction of cotton producing a toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) for pink bollworm control. Using statewide pheromone trapping and climatic data in conjunction with deterministic simulation models, we investigated whether manipulation of cotton planting date and use of other cultural control methods could represent valuable tactics for control of the pink bollworm in Arizona. Accumulation of heat units from one January accurately predicted the rate of pink bollworm emergence from diapause in 15 cotton-producing regions. Significant variation in rate of emergence from diapause was present among regions, with earlier emergence at higher altitudes. Most adults emerge from diapause too early to reproduce successfully on cotton, a phenomenon known as suicidal emergence. A method for prediction of the fraction of suicidal emergence resulting from adoption of a given cotton planting date is presented. Results from simulation models suggest that manipulation of planting date and implementation of other control cultural methods reduce the rate of application of insecticides and delay the evolution of resistance to Bt cotton in the pink bollworm.",
keywords = "Bacillus thuringiensis, Diapause, Heat units, Pectinophora gossypiella, Resistance management, Transgenic cotton",
author = "Yves Carriere and Christa Ellers-Kirk and Brent Pedersen and Shirley Haller and Larry Antilla",
year = "2001",
month = "10",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "94",
pages = "1012--1021",
journal = "Journal of Economic Entomology",
issn = "0022-0493",
publisher = "Entomological Society of America",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predicting spring moth emergence in the pink bollworm (Lepidoptera

T2 - Gelechiidae): Implications for managing resistance to transgenic cotton

AU - Carriere, Yves

AU - Ellers-Kirk, Christa

AU - Pedersen, Brent

AU - Haller, Shirley

AU - Antilla, Larry

PY - 2001/10

Y1 - 2001/10

N2 - Cultural control methods have been central in the southwestern United States for reducing pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders), damage to cotton. Nevertheless, it is not clear at present how such methods could be integrated within the novel pest management framework allowed by introduction of cotton producing a toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) for pink bollworm control. Using statewide pheromone trapping and climatic data in conjunction with deterministic simulation models, we investigated whether manipulation of cotton planting date and use of other cultural control methods could represent valuable tactics for control of the pink bollworm in Arizona. Accumulation of heat units from one January accurately predicted the rate of pink bollworm emergence from diapause in 15 cotton-producing regions. Significant variation in rate of emergence from diapause was present among regions, with earlier emergence at higher altitudes. Most adults emerge from diapause too early to reproduce successfully on cotton, a phenomenon known as suicidal emergence. A method for prediction of the fraction of suicidal emergence resulting from adoption of a given cotton planting date is presented. Results from simulation models suggest that manipulation of planting date and implementation of other control cultural methods reduce the rate of application of insecticides and delay the evolution of resistance to Bt cotton in the pink bollworm.

AB - Cultural control methods have been central in the southwestern United States for reducing pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders), damage to cotton. Nevertheless, it is not clear at present how such methods could be integrated within the novel pest management framework allowed by introduction of cotton producing a toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) for pink bollworm control. Using statewide pheromone trapping and climatic data in conjunction with deterministic simulation models, we investigated whether manipulation of cotton planting date and use of other cultural control methods could represent valuable tactics for control of the pink bollworm in Arizona. Accumulation of heat units from one January accurately predicted the rate of pink bollworm emergence from diapause in 15 cotton-producing regions. Significant variation in rate of emergence from diapause was present among regions, with earlier emergence at higher altitudes. Most adults emerge from diapause too early to reproduce successfully on cotton, a phenomenon known as suicidal emergence. A method for prediction of the fraction of suicidal emergence resulting from adoption of a given cotton planting date is presented. Results from simulation models suggest that manipulation of planting date and implementation of other control cultural methods reduce the rate of application of insecticides and delay the evolution of resistance to Bt cotton in the pink bollworm.

KW - Bacillus thuringiensis

KW - Diapause

KW - Heat units

KW - Pectinophora gossypiella

KW - Resistance management

KW - Transgenic cotton

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035487658&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035487658&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11681660

AN - SCOPUS:0035487658

VL - 94

SP - 1012

EP - 1021

JO - Journal of Economic Entomology

JF - Journal of Economic Entomology

SN - 0022-0493

IS - 5

ER -