Prediction of Boston naming test performance from vocabulary scores

Preliminary guidelines for interpretation

William Killgore, Russell L. Adams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients with limited education or underdeveloped vocabulary skills may perform below the normal range on the Boston Naming Test when compared to the original published norms, even in the absence of brain damage. To reduce the frequency of false positive dysnomic classifications of patients with limited vocabulary skills we developed a score adjustment to account for the significant shared variance between scores on this test and the WAIS-R Vocabulary subtest. Vocabulary significantly predicted performance on the Boston Naming Test (r = .65, p<.0001) in a sample of 62 outpatients who had no objective evidence of brain damage. Linear regression was used to derive expected performance on the Boston Naming Test from Vocabulary scaled scores. Relative to the original published norms, scores based on the Vocabulary subtest cut-offs produced fewer false positives and more accurately classified group membership for patients with and without objectively verified brain damage. These performance predictions are offered as tentative guidelines to assist clinicians in evaluating the presence of naming deficits by controlling for the variance associated with knowledge of vocabulary.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-337
Number of pages11
JournalPerceptual and Motor Skills
Volume89
Issue number1
StatePublished - Aug 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Language Tests
Vocabulary
Guidelines
Brain
Social Adjustment
Linear Models
Reference Values
Outpatients
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Prediction of Boston naming test performance from vocabulary scores : Preliminary guidelines for interpretation. / Killgore, William; Adams, Russell L.

In: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Vol. 89, No. 1, 08.1999, p. 327-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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