Predictors of relapse for american Indian women after substance abuse treatment.

Jenny Chong, Darlene Lopez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective of this study was to describe the predictors of substance use relapse of American Indian (AI) women up to one year following substance abuse treatment. Relapse is defi ned as any use of alcohol or drugs in the past 30 days at the follow-up points. Data were collected from AI women in a 45-day residential substance abuse treatment program. Predictors include distal (in time) proximal (recent), and intrapersonal factors. Results indicated that intrapersonal factors showed the strongest relationship with relapse, followed by proximal and distal factors. Negative messages about using alcohol or drugs from the client's father while growing up may have had an impact on whether the client used alcohol at 6 months. Confl icts with other people and being in the company of alcohol or drug users were highly predictive of relapse. While craving was highly predictive of substance use at follow up, self-efficacy was highly predictive of no substance use. Knowledge about predictors of relapse among this population should be used as a guide toward individual treatment planning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-48
Number of pages25
JournalAmerican Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research
Volume14
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2008

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North American Indians
relapse
American Indian
substance abuse
Substance-Related Disorders
Recurrence
alcohol
Alcohols
drug
Therapeutics
Self Efficacy
Drug Users
Fathers
Pharmaceutical Preparations
self-efficacy
father
American Indians
Predictors
Substance Abuse
Relapse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Predictors of relapse for american Indian women after substance abuse treatment. / Chong, Jenny; Lopez, Darlene.

In: American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research, Vol. 14, No. 3, 2008, p. 24-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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