Premelting at ice-solid interfaces studied via velocity-dependent indentation with force microscope tips

B. Pittenger, Jr Fain S.C., M. J. Cochran, J. M K Donev, Brant E Robertson, A. Szuchmacher, R. M. Overney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have indented the surface of ice at temperatures between -1 °C and -17 °C with sharp atomic force microscope tips. For a thick viscous interfacial melt layer, a Newtonian treatment of the flow of quasiliquid between the tip and the ice suggests that indentations at different indentation velocities should have the same force/velocity ratio for a given pit depth. This is observed for silicon tips with and without a hydrophobic coating at temperatures between - 1 °C and - 10 °C implying the presence of a liquid-like layer at the interface between tip and ice. At temperatures below about -10 °C the dependence of force on velocity is weaker, suggesting that plastic flow of the ice dominates. A simple model for viscous flow that incorporates the approximate shape of our tip is used to obtain an estimate of the layer thickness, assuming the layer has the viscosity of supercooled water. The largest layer thicknesses inferred from this model are too thin to be described by continuum mechanics, but the model fits the data well. This suggests that the viscosity of the confined quasiliquid is much greater than that of bulk supercooled water. The hydrophobically coated tip has a significantly thinner layer than the uncoated tip, but the dependence of thickness on temperature is similar. The estimated viscous layer thickness increases with increasing temperature as expected for a quasiliquid premelt layer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number134102
Pages (from-to)1341021-13410215
Number of pages12069195
JournalPhysical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics
Volume63
Issue number13
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ice
indentation
Indentation
ice
Microscopes
microscopes
Temperature
Viscosity
Continuum mechanics
Water
Silicon
Viscous flow
Plastic flow
temperature
viscosity
continuum mechanics
plastic flow
viscous flow
Coatings
water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Pittenger, B., Fain S.C., J., Cochran, M. J., Donev, J. M. K., Robertson, B. E., Szuchmacher, A., & Overney, R. M. (2001). Premelting at ice-solid interfaces studied via velocity-dependent indentation with force microscope tips. Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, 63(13), 1341021-13410215. [134102].

Premelting at ice-solid interfaces studied via velocity-dependent indentation with force microscope tips. / Pittenger, B.; Fain S.C., Jr; Cochran, M. J.; Donev, J. M K; Robertson, Brant E; Szuchmacher, A.; Overney, R. M.

In: Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Vol. 63, No. 13, 134102, 2001, p. 1341021-13410215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pittenger, B, Fain S.C., J, Cochran, MJ, Donev, JMK, Robertson, BE, Szuchmacher, A & Overney, RM 2001, 'Premelting at ice-solid interfaces studied via velocity-dependent indentation with force microscope tips', Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, vol. 63, no. 13, 134102, pp. 1341021-13410215.
Pittenger, B. ; Fain S.C., Jr ; Cochran, M. J. ; Donev, J. M K ; Robertson, Brant E ; Szuchmacher, A. ; Overney, R. M. / Premelting at ice-solid interfaces studied via velocity-dependent indentation with force microscope tips. In: Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics. 2001 ; Vol. 63, No. 13. pp. 1341021-13410215.
@article{7c4b938c3e4f462cbd507a48de601510,
title = "Premelting at ice-solid interfaces studied via velocity-dependent indentation with force microscope tips",
abstract = "We have indented the surface of ice at temperatures between -1 °C and -17 °C with sharp atomic force microscope tips. For a thick viscous interfacial melt layer, a Newtonian treatment of the flow of quasiliquid between the tip and the ice suggests that indentations at different indentation velocities should have the same force/velocity ratio for a given pit depth. This is observed for silicon tips with and without a hydrophobic coating at temperatures between - 1 °C and - 10 °C implying the presence of a liquid-like layer at the interface between tip and ice. At temperatures below about -10 °C the dependence of force on velocity is weaker, suggesting that plastic flow of the ice dominates. A simple model for viscous flow that incorporates the approximate shape of our tip is used to obtain an estimate of the layer thickness, assuming the layer has the viscosity of supercooled water. The largest layer thicknesses inferred from this model are too thin to be described by continuum mechanics, but the model fits the data well. This suggests that the viscosity of the confined quasiliquid is much greater than that of bulk supercooled water. The hydrophobically coated tip has a significantly thinner layer than the uncoated tip, but the dependence of thickness on temperature is similar. The estimated viscous layer thickness increases with increasing temperature as expected for a quasiliquid premelt layer.",
author = "B. Pittenger and {Fain S.C.}, Jr and Cochran, {M. J.} and Donev, {J. M K} and Robertson, {Brant E} and A. Szuchmacher and Overney, {R. M.}",
year = "2001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "63",
pages = "1341021--13410215",
journal = "Physical Review B-Condensed Matter",
issn = "0163-1829",
publisher = "American Institute of Physics Publising LLC",
number = "13",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Premelting at ice-solid interfaces studied via velocity-dependent indentation with force microscope tips

AU - Pittenger, B.

AU - Fain S.C., Jr

AU - Cochran, M. J.

AU - Donev, J. M K

AU - Robertson, Brant E

AU - Szuchmacher, A.

AU - Overney, R. M.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - We have indented the surface of ice at temperatures between -1 °C and -17 °C with sharp atomic force microscope tips. For a thick viscous interfacial melt layer, a Newtonian treatment of the flow of quasiliquid between the tip and the ice suggests that indentations at different indentation velocities should have the same force/velocity ratio for a given pit depth. This is observed for silicon tips with and without a hydrophobic coating at temperatures between - 1 °C and - 10 °C implying the presence of a liquid-like layer at the interface between tip and ice. At temperatures below about -10 °C the dependence of force on velocity is weaker, suggesting that plastic flow of the ice dominates. A simple model for viscous flow that incorporates the approximate shape of our tip is used to obtain an estimate of the layer thickness, assuming the layer has the viscosity of supercooled water. The largest layer thicknesses inferred from this model are too thin to be described by continuum mechanics, but the model fits the data well. This suggests that the viscosity of the confined quasiliquid is much greater than that of bulk supercooled water. The hydrophobically coated tip has a significantly thinner layer than the uncoated tip, but the dependence of thickness on temperature is similar. The estimated viscous layer thickness increases with increasing temperature as expected for a quasiliquid premelt layer.

AB - We have indented the surface of ice at temperatures between -1 °C and -17 °C with sharp atomic force microscope tips. For a thick viscous interfacial melt layer, a Newtonian treatment of the flow of quasiliquid between the tip and the ice suggests that indentations at different indentation velocities should have the same force/velocity ratio for a given pit depth. This is observed for silicon tips with and without a hydrophobic coating at temperatures between - 1 °C and - 10 °C implying the presence of a liquid-like layer at the interface between tip and ice. At temperatures below about -10 °C the dependence of force on velocity is weaker, suggesting that plastic flow of the ice dominates. A simple model for viscous flow that incorporates the approximate shape of our tip is used to obtain an estimate of the layer thickness, assuming the layer has the viscosity of supercooled water. The largest layer thicknesses inferred from this model are too thin to be described by continuum mechanics, but the model fits the data well. This suggests that the viscosity of the confined quasiliquid is much greater than that of bulk supercooled water. The hydrophobically coated tip has a significantly thinner layer than the uncoated tip, but the dependence of thickness on temperature is similar. The estimated viscous layer thickness increases with increasing temperature as expected for a quasiliquid premelt layer.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034905277&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034905277&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0034905277

VL - 63

SP - 1341021

EP - 13410215

JO - Physical Review B-Condensed Matter

JF - Physical Review B-Condensed Matter

SN - 0163-1829

IS - 13

M1 - 134102

ER -