Prenatal tobacco smoke exposure is associated with childhood DNA CpG methylation

ON BEHALF OF THE ASTHMA BRIDGE CONSORTIUM

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Smoking while pregnant is associated with a myriad of negative health outcomes both for the mother and for the fetus. [1] In utero tobacco smoke exposure (IUS) can damage the placental structure and function [2], is associated with changes in children’s neurodevelopment and behavior [3] as well as with impaired lung function and increased risk of developing asthma. [4], [5], [6] Moreover, IUS-related deficits in lung function are larger for children with asthma. [7].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEveryday Environmental Toxins
Subtitle of host publicationChildrens Exposure Risks
PublisherApple Academic Press
Pages43-61
Number of pages19
ISBN (Electronic)9781498718158
ISBN (Print)9781771881012
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

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    ON BEHALF OF THE ASTHMA BRIDGE CONSORTIUM (2015). Prenatal tobacco smoke exposure is associated with childhood DNA CpG methylation. In Everyday Environmental Toxins: Childrens Exposure Risks (pp. 43-61). Apple Academic Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/b18221