Prescribing and self-administration of morphine in Hispanic and non-Hispanic Caucasian patients treated with patient-controlled analgesia

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether differences in either prescribing or self-administration of morphine exist between Hispanic and White (Caucasian) post-operative patients treated with patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). A review of the medical records of 30 Hispanic and 30 White patients who received postoperative PCA was conducted. Both prescribed and self-administered morphine were analyzed using a two-sided, two-sample Student's t-test. No differences in the amount of morphine prescribed (11.23 ± 3.22 mg/hr in Hispanic patients, 11.05 ± 4.28 mg/hr in White patients; p = 0.8503) or self-administered (2.58 ± 2.02 mg/hr in Hispanic patients, 3.32 ± 3.00 mg/hr in White patients; p = 0.2711) were discovered. This study identified no statistically significant difference in either opioid prescribing or self-administration between Hispanic and White post-operative patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-38
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy
Volume18
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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Keywords

  • Caucasian
  • Ethnicity
  • Hispanic
  • Pain
  • Patient-controlled analgesia
  • Race
  • White

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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