Primary prevention of colon cancer with dietary and micronutrient interventions

David S Alberts, Martha L. Slattery, Edward Giovannucci, Moshe Shike, Dava J. Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Overall, colorectal carcinoma is the second leading cause of cancer death and the third most common carcinoma in both females and males in the United States. Adjusted incidence rates for whites are consistently higher than those for African Americans, whereas case-fatality rates are consistently lower for whites. Its etiology appears to be related to a complex interaction of environmental and genetic factors. Proposed dietary risk factors for colon carcinoma include excess fat intake and low intakes of fruits, vegetables, dietary fiber, calcium, and other micronutrients. Phase III clinical dietary and micronutrient trials are being conducted with the support of the National Cancer Institute for low fat-high fruits and vegetables, wheat bran fiber, calcium, folic acid, and selenium employing colonic adenoma recurrence as the primary outcome endpoint. If these studies are positive, then the implementation of dietary and/or micronutrient interventions could have an immense public health impact by reducing colon carcinoma mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1734-1739
Number of pages6
JournalCancer
Volume83
Issue number8 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Oct 15 1998

Fingerprint

Micronutrients
Primary Prevention
Colonic Neoplasms
Dietary Fiber
Carcinoma
Vegetables
Fruit
Colon
Fats
Dietary Calcium
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Mortality
Selenium
Folic Acid
African Americans
Adenoma
Cause of Death
Colorectal Neoplasms
Public Health
Calcium

Keywords

  • Clinical trials
  • Colon cancer
  • Minority populations
  • Nutrition
  • Prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Alberts, D. S., Slattery, M. L., Giovannucci, E., Shike, M., & Garcia, D. J. (1998). Primary prevention of colon cancer with dietary and micronutrient interventions. Cancer, 83(8 SUPPL.), 1734-1739.

Primary prevention of colon cancer with dietary and micronutrient interventions. / Alberts, David S; Slattery, Martha L.; Giovannucci, Edward; Shike, Moshe; Garcia, Dava J.

In: Cancer, Vol. 83, No. 8 SUPPL., 15.10.1998, p. 1734-1739.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alberts, DS, Slattery, ML, Giovannucci, E, Shike, M & Garcia, DJ 1998, 'Primary prevention of colon cancer with dietary and micronutrient interventions', Cancer, vol. 83, no. 8 SUPPL., pp. 1734-1739.
Alberts DS, Slattery ML, Giovannucci E, Shike M, Garcia DJ. Primary prevention of colon cancer with dietary and micronutrient interventions. Cancer. 1998 Oct 15;83(8 SUPPL.):1734-1739.
Alberts, David S ; Slattery, Martha L. ; Giovannucci, Edward ; Shike, Moshe ; Garcia, Dava J. / Primary prevention of colon cancer with dietary and micronutrient interventions. In: Cancer. 1998 ; Vol. 83, No. 8 SUPPL. pp. 1734-1739.
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