Problem-based learning beyond borders: Impact and potential for university-level human rights education

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article outlines a cutting-edge pedagogy I have branded problem-based learning beyond borders, which I have employed in a wide variety of human rights courses and in developing curriculum for two graduate programs in human rights. It involves engaging students, faculty, and community members in real-world problems usually raised by the community members. This pedagogy could be employed successfully in a range of human rights courses and programs but faculty members are often reluctant to adopt a new pedagogy, especially when it involves shifting their pedagogical ethos. So here I offer a number of compelling examples of this pedagogy drawn from my human rights classes, and then I turn to the question of best practices for encouraging other human rights faculty members to adopt such cutting-edge active-learning pedagogies. I end with some practical advice that should be applicable when encouraging faculty to experiment with such innovative pedagogies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)280-292
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Human Rights
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 27 2019

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations
  • Law

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Problem-based learning beyond borders : Impact and potential for university-level human rights education. / Simmons, William P.

In: Journal of Human Rights, Vol. 18, No. 3, 27.05.2019, p. 280-292.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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