Problem-solving approach to agraphia treatment: Interactive use of lexical and sublexical spelling routes

Pelagie M Beeson, Molly A. Rewega, Sheila Vail, Steven Z Rapcsak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two patients with acquired spelling impairments due to left hemisphere brain damage participated in a treatment protocol to improve their written spelling. Prior to the initiation of writing treatment, both patients showed some ability to take advantage of sound-to-letter correspondences that resulted in phonologically plausible spelling errors. A homework-based treatment was implemented to improve their ability to resolve spelling errors by increased reliance on phoneme-to-grapheme conversion, self-correction, and use of an electronic speller. Both patients improved their spelling abilities and provided evidence of interactive use of partially spared lexical and sublexical spelling routes to resolve their spelling difficulties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)551-565
Number of pages15
JournalAphasiology
Volume14
Issue number5-6
StatePublished - May 2000

Fingerprint

Agraphia
Aptitude
ability
brain damage
homework
Clinical Protocols
Therapeutics
electronics
Brain
evidence
Problem Solving
Route
Spelling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Problem-solving approach to agraphia treatment : Interactive use of lexical and sublexical spelling routes. / Beeson, Pelagie M; Rewega, Molly A.; Vail, Sheila; Rapcsak, Steven Z.

In: Aphasiology, Vol. 14, No. 5-6, 05.2000, p. 551-565.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{260904f539bc42bb940c6dd1f94933f3,
title = "Problem-solving approach to agraphia treatment: Interactive use of lexical and sublexical spelling routes",
abstract = "Two patients with acquired spelling impairments due to left hemisphere brain damage participated in a treatment protocol to improve their written spelling. Prior to the initiation of writing treatment, both patients showed some ability to take advantage of sound-to-letter correspondences that resulted in phonologically plausible spelling errors. A homework-based treatment was implemented to improve their ability to resolve spelling errors by increased reliance on phoneme-to-grapheme conversion, self-correction, and use of an electronic speller. Both patients improved their spelling abilities and provided evidence of interactive use of partially spared lexical and sublexical spelling routes to resolve their spelling difficulties.",
author = "Beeson, {Pelagie M} and Rewega, {Molly A.} and Sheila Vail and Rapcsak, {Steven Z}",
year = "2000",
month = "5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "551--565",
journal = "Aphasiology",
issn = "0268-7038",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "5-6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Problem-solving approach to agraphia treatment

T2 - Interactive use of lexical and sublexical spelling routes

AU - Beeson, Pelagie M

AU - Rewega, Molly A.

AU - Vail, Sheila

AU - Rapcsak, Steven Z

PY - 2000/5

Y1 - 2000/5

N2 - Two patients with acquired spelling impairments due to left hemisphere brain damage participated in a treatment protocol to improve their written spelling. Prior to the initiation of writing treatment, both patients showed some ability to take advantage of sound-to-letter correspondences that resulted in phonologically plausible spelling errors. A homework-based treatment was implemented to improve their ability to resolve spelling errors by increased reliance on phoneme-to-grapheme conversion, self-correction, and use of an electronic speller. Both patients improved their spelling abilities and provided evidence of interactive use of partially spared lexical and sublexical spelling routes to resolve their spelling difficulties.

AB - Two patients with acquired spelling impairments due to left hemisphere brain damage participated in a treatment protocol to improve their written spelling. Prior to the initiation of writing treatment, both patients showed some ability to take advantage of sound-to-letter correspondences that resulted in phonologically plausible spelling errors. A homework-based treatment was implemented to improve their ability to resolve spelling errors by increased reliance on phoneme-to-grapheme conversion, self-correction, and use of an electronic speller. Both patients improved their spelling abilities and provided evidence of interactive use of partially spared lexical and sublexical spelling routes to resolve their spelling difficulties.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034098353&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034098353&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0034098353

VL - 14

SP - 551

EP - 565

JO - Aphasiology

JF - Aphasiology

SN - 0268-7038

IS - 5-6

ER -