Problems and possible solutions concerning radiocarbon dating of surface marine sediments, Ross Sea, Antarctica

John T. Andrews, Eugene W. Domack, Wendy L. Cunningham, Amy Leventer, Kathy J. Licht, A. J Timothy Jull, David J. DeMaster, Anne E. Jennings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) dates on the acid-insoluble fraction from 38 core tops from the western Ross Sea, Antarctica, are used to address these questions: (1) What are the apparent ages of sediments at or close to the present sediment/water interface? (2) Is there a statistically significant pattern to the spatial distribution of core top ages? and (3) Is there a 'correction factor' that can be applied to these age determinations to obtain the best possible Holocene (downcore) chronologies? Ages of core top sediments range from 2000 to 21,000 14C yr B.P. Some 'old' core top dates are from piston cores and probably represent the loss of sediment during the coring process, but some core top samples >6000 14C yr B.P. may represent little or no Holocene deposition. Four possible sources of variability in dates ≤6000 14C yr B.P. (n = 28) are associated with (1) different sample preparation methods, (2) different sediment recovery systems, (3) different geographic regions, and (4) within-sample lateral age variability. Statistical analysis on an a posteriori design indicates that geographic area is the major cause of variability; there is a difference in mean surface sediment age of nearly 2000 yr between sites in the western Ross Sea and sites east of Ross Bank in south-central Ross Sea. The systematic variability in surface age between areas may be attributed to: (a) variable sediment accumulation rates (SAR) (surface age is inversely related to SAR), (b) differences in the percentage of reworked (dead) carbon between each area, and/or (c) differences in the CO2 exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-216
Number of pages11
JournalQuaternary Research
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1999

Fingerprint

radiocarbon dating
marine sediment
sediment
accumulation rate
Holocene
sediment-water interface
sample preparation
age determination
sea
Antarctica
Sediment
Radiocarbon Dating
chronology
statistical analysis
spatial distribution
atmosphere
acid
carbon
ocean

Keywords

  • Marine surface sediments
  • Radiocarbon dating
  • Ross Sea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Andrews, J. T., Domack, E. W., Cunningham, W. L., Leventer, A., Licht, K. J., Jull, A. J. T., ... Jennings, A. E. (1999). Problems and possible solutions concerning radiocarbon dating of surface marine sediments, Ross Sea, Antarctica. Quaternary Research, 52(2), 206-216. https://doi.org/10.1006/qres.1999.2047

Problems and possible solutions concerning radiocarbon dating of surface marine sediments, Ross Sea, Antarctica. / Andrews, John T.; Domack, Eugene W.; Cunningham, Wendy L.; Leventer, Amy; Licht, Kathy J.; Jull, A. J Timothy; DeMaster, David J.; Jennings, Anne E.

In: Quaternary Research, Vol. 52, No. 2, 09.1999, p. 206-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Andrews, JT, Domack, EW, Cunningham, WL, Leventer, A, Licht, KJ, Jull, AJT, DeMaster, DJ & Jennings, AE 1999, 'Problems and possible solutions concerning radiocarbon dating of surface marine sediments, Ross Sea, Antarctica', Quaternary Research, vol. 52, no. 2, pp. 206-216. https://doi.org/10.1006/qres.1999.2047
Andrews, John T. ; Domack, Eugene W. ; Cunningham, Wendy L. ; Leventer, Amy ; Licht, Kathy J. ; Jull, A. J Timothy ; DeMaster, David J. ; Jennings, Anne E. / Problems and possible solutions concerning radiocarbon dating of surface marine sediments, Ross Sea, Antarctica. In: Quaternary Research. 1999 ; Vol. 52, No. 2. pp. 206-216.
@article{50efc274c64045489ff4e779ae6d91b0,
title = "Problems and possible solutions concerning radiocarbon dating of surface marine sediments, Ross Sea, Antarctica",
abstract = "Radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) dates on the acid-insoluble fraction from 38 core tops from the western Ross Sea, Antarctica, are used to address these questions: (1) What are the apparent ages of sediments at or close to the present sediment/water interface? (2) Is there a statistically significant pattern to the spatial distribution of core top ages? and (3) Is there a 'correction factor' that can be applied to these age determinations to obtain the best possible Holocene (downcore) chronologies? Ages of core top sediments range from 2000 to 21,000 14C yr B.P. Some 'old' core top dates are from piston cores and probably represent the loss of sediment during the coring process, but some core top samples >6000 14C yr B.P. may represent little or no Holocene deposition. Four possible sources of variability in dates ≤6000 14C yr B.P. (n = 28) are associated with (1) different sample preparation methods, (2) different sediment recovery systems, (3) different geographic regions, and (4) within-sample lateral age variability. Statistical analysis on an a posteriori design indicates that geographic area is the major cause of variability; there is a difference in mean surface sediment age of nearly 2000 yr between sites in the western Ross Sea and sites east of Ross Bank in south-central Ross Sea. The systematic variability in surface age between areas may be attributed to: (a) variable sediment accumulation rates (SAR) (surface age is inversely related to SAR), (b) differences in the percentage of reworked (dead) carbon between each area, and/or (c) differences in the CO2 exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere.",
keywords = "Marine surface sediments, Radiocarbon dating, Ross Sea",
author = "Andrews, {John T.} and Domack, {Eugene W.} and Cunningham, {Wendy L.} and Amy Leventer and Licht, {Kathy J.} and Jull, {A. J Timothy} and DeMaster, {David J.} and Jennings, {Anne E.}",
year = "1999",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1006/qres.1999.2047",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "52",
pages = "206--216",
journal = "Quaternary Research",
issn = "0033-5894",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Problems and possible solutions concerning radiocarbon dating of surface marine sediments, Ross Sea, Antarctica

AU - Andrews, John T.

AU - Domack, Eugene W.

AU - Cunningham, Wendy L.

AU - Leventer, Amy

AU - Licht, Kathy J.

AU - Jull, A. J Timothy

AU - DeMaster, David J.

AU - Jennings, Anne E.

PY - 1999/9

Y1 - 1999/9

N2 - Radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) dates on the acid-insoluble fraction from 38 core tops from the western Ross Sea, Antarctica, are used to address these questions: (1) What are the apparent ages of sediments at or close to the present sediment/water interface? (2) Is there a statistically significant pattern to the spatial distribution of core top ages? and (3) Is there a 'correction factor' that can be applied to these age determinations to obtain the best possible Holocene (downcore) chronologies? Ages of core top sediments range from 2000 to 21,000 14C yr B.P. Some 'old' core top dates are from piston cores and probably represent the loss of sediment during the coring process, but some core top samples >6000 14C yr B.P. may represent little or no Holocene deposition. Four possible sources of variability in dates ≤6000 14C yr B.P. (n = 28) are associated with (1) different sample preparation methods, (2) different sediment recovery systems, (3) different geographic regions, and (4) within-sample lateral age variability. Statistical analysis on an a posteriori design indicates that geographic area is the major cause of variability; there is a difference in mean surface sediment age of nearly 2000 yr between sites in the western Ross Sea and sites east of Ross Bank in south-central Ross Sea. The systematic variability in surface age between areas may be attributed to: (a) variable sediment accumulation rates (SAR) (surface age is inversely related to SAR), (b) differences in the percentage of reworked (dead) carbon between each area, and/or (c) differences in the CO2 exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere.

AB - Radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) dates on the acid-insoluble fraction from 38 core tops from the western Ross Sea, Antarctica, are used to address these questions: (1) What are the apparent ages of sediments at or close to the present sediment/water interface? (2) Is there a statistically significant pattern to the spatial distribution of core top ages? and (3) Is there a 'correction factor' that can be applied to these age determinations to obtain the best possible Holocene (downcore) chronologies? Ages of core top sediments range from 2000 to 21,000 14C yr B.P. Some 'old' core top dates are from piston cores and probably represent the loss of sediment during the coring process, but some core top samples >6000 14C yr B.P. may represent little or no Holocene deposition. Four possible sources of variability in dates ≤6000 14C yr B.P. (n = 28) are associated with (1) different sample preparation methods, (2) different sediment recovery systems, (3) different geographic regions, and (4) within-sample lateral age variability. Statistical analysis on an a posteriori design indicates that geographic area is the major cause of variability; there is a difference in mean surface sediment age of nearly 2000 yr between sites in the western Ross Sea and sites east of Ross Bank in south-central Ross Sea. The systematic variability in surface age between areas may be attributed to: (a) variable sediment accumulation rates (SAR) (surface age is inversely related to SAR), (b) differences in the percentage of reworked (dead) carbon between each area, and/or (c) differences in the CO2 exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere.

KW - Marine surface sediments

KW - Radiocarbon dating

KW - Ross Sea

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033372549&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033372549&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1006/qres.1999.2047

DO - 10.1006/qres.1999.2047

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0033372549

VL - 52

SP - 206

EP - 216

JO - Quaternary Research

JF - Quaternary Research

SN - 0033-5894

IS - 2

ER -