Progress in the development of large-area modular 64×64 CdZnTe imaging arrays for nuclear medicine

K. J. Matherson, H. B. Barber, H. H. Barrett, J. D. Eskin, E. L. Dereniak, D. G. Marks, J. M. Woolfenden, E. T. Young, F. L. Augustine

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous efforts by our group have demonstrated the potential of hybrid semiconductor detector arrays for use in gamma-ray imaging applications. In this paper, we describe progress in the development of a prototype imaging system consisting of a 64×64-pixel CdZnTe detector array mated to a multiplexer readout circuit that was custom designed for our nuclear medicine application. The detector array consists of a 0.15 cm thick slab of CdZnTe which has a 64×64 array of 380 um square pixel electrodes on one side produced by photolithography; the other side has a continuous electrode biased at -150 V. Electrical connections between the detector electrodes and corresponding multiplexer bump pads are made with indium bump bonds. Although the CdZnTe detector arrays characterized in this paper are room-temperature devices, a slight amount of cooling is necessary to reduce thermally generated dark current in the detectors. Initial tests show that this prototype imager functions well with more than 90% of its pixels operating. The device is an excellent imager; phantom images have a spatial resolution of 1.5 mm, limited by the collimator bore.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages276-280
Number of pages5
StatePublished - 1997
EventProceedings of the 1997 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium - Albuquerque, NM, USA
Duration: Nov 9 1997Nov 15 1997

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1997 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium
CityAlbuquerque, NM, USA
Period11/9/9711/15/97

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiation
  • Nuclear and High Energy Physics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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