Promoting ethical research with American Indian and Alaska native people living in urban areas

Nicole P Yuan, Jami Bartgis, Deirdre Demers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most health research with American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people has focused on tribal communities on reservation lands. Few studies have been conducted with AI/AN people living in urban settings despite their documented health disparities compared with other urban populations. There are unique considerations for working with this population. Engaging key stakeholders, including urban Indian health organization leaders, tribal leaders, research scientists and administrators, and policymakers, is critical to promoting ethical research and enhancing capacity of urban AI/AN communities. Recommendations for their involvement may facilitate an open dialogue and promote the development of implementation strategies. Future collaborations are also necessary for establishing research policies aimed at improving the health of the urban AI/AN population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2085-2091
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume104
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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North American Indians
Urban Health
Research
Urban Population
Health
Administrative Personnel
Population
Organizations
Alaska Natives

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Promoting ethical research with American Indian and Alaska native people living in urban areas. / Yuan, Nicole P; Bartgis, Jami; Demers, Deirdre.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 104, No. 11, 01.11.2014, p. 2085-2091.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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