Prophylactic gatifloxacin therapy in prevention of bacterial keratitis in a rabbit laser in situ keratomileusis model

D. Snow Slade, Jason W. Friday, Robert W. Snyder, David E. Nix, Leigh B. Kleinert, Vangie B. Patula

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Use the ID50 (infectious dose to 50% of experimental animals) to quantify the most effective prophylactic dosing regimen to use with gatifloxacin 0.3% (Zymar) for the prevention of keratitis in a rabbit laser in situ keratomileusis model of Staphylococcus epidermidis infection. Setting: University Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA. Methods: Two groups of rabbits were compared in each of 2 experiments that were separated by 12 months. In the first experiment, rabbits receiving no postoperative antibiotic therapy (Group 1) were compared with rabbits receiving postoperative antibiotic therapy (Group 2). In the second experiment, postoperative antibiotic therapy (Group 3) was compared with preoperative and postoperative antibiotic therapy (Group 4). All antibiotic regimens used gatifloxacin 0.3%. Before antibiotic therapy began, corneal pockets were created in the right eye of each rabbit and all rabbits received balanced salt solution (BSS) only or BSS and S epidermidis inoculations in the corneal pocket. Rabbits were monitored for corneal infiltrates after surgery. Results: The ID50 of the first, second, third, and fourth groups of rabbits was 102, 104, 105, and 107 organisms, respectively. The data showed a statistically significant difference between rabbits receiving BSS only and most rabbits receiving BSS plus inoculate at each postoperative measurement (P<.05). Conclusions: The findings suggest that the use of both preoperative and postoperative antibiotic therapy may be most effective in preventing infection. Postoperative antibiotic therapy increased the number of S epidermidis necessary to cause infection by at least 100-fold over no antibiotic intervention. Preoperative plus postoperative antibiotic therapy increased the number of bacteria necessary to cause infection by at least 100-fold over postoperative therapy alone and by more than 10000-fold over no antibiotic intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)888-892
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

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Laser In Situ Keratomileusis
Keratitis
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Rabbits
Group Psychotherapy
Salts
Therapeutics
Infection
gatifloxacin
Staphylococcus epidermidis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Prophylactic gatifloxacin therapy in prevention of bacterial keratitis in a rabbit laser in situ keratomileusis model. / Slade, D. Snow; Friday, Jason W.; Snyder, Robert W.; Nix, David E.; Kleinert, Leigh B.; Patula, Vangie B.

In: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, Vol. 33, No. 5, 05.2007, p. 888-892.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Slade, D. Snow ; Friday, Jason W. ; Snyder, Robert W. ; Nix, David E. ; Kleinert, Leigh B. ; Patula, Vangie B. / Prophylactic gatifloxacin therapy in prevention of bacterial keratitis in a rabbit laser in situ keratomileusis model. In: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. 2007 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 888-892.
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abstract = "Purpose: Use the ID50 (infectious dose to 50{\%} of experimental animals) to quantify the most effective prophylactic dosing regimen to use with gatifloxacin 0.3{\%} (Zymar) for the prevention of keratitis in a rabbit laser in situ keratomileusis model of Staphylococcus epidermidis infection. Setting: University Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA. Methods: Two groups of rabbits were compared in each of 2 experiments that were separated by 12 months. In the first experiment, rabbits receiving no postoperative antibiotic therapy (Group 1) were compared with rabbits receiving postoperative antibiotic therapy (Group 2). In the second experiment, postoperative antibiotic therapy (Group 3) was compared with preoperative and postoperative antibiotic therapy (Group 4). All antibiotic regimens used gatifloxacin 0.3{\%}. Before antibiotic therapy began, corneal pockets were created in the right eye of each rabbit and all rabbits received balanced salt solution (BSS) only or BSS and S epidermidis inoculations in the corneal pocket. Rabbits were monitored for corneal infiltrates after surgery. Results: The ID50 of the first, second, third, and fourth groups of rabbits was 102, 104, 105, and 107 organisms, respectively. The data showed a statistically significant difference between rabbits receiving BSS only and most rabbits receiving BSS plus inoculate at each postoperative measurement (P<.05). Conclusions: The findings suggest that the use of both preoperative and postoperative antibiotic therapy may be most effective in preventing infection. Postoperative antibiotic therapy increased the number of S epidermidis necessary to cause infection by at least 100-fold over no antibiotic intervention. Preoperative plus postoperative antibiotic therapy increased the number of bacteria necessary to cause infection by at least 100-fold over postoperative therapy alone and by more than 10000-fold over no antibiotic intervention.",
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