Prosodic structure in young children's Language Production

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

115 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research in prosodic phonology, as well as experiments on adult speech production, suggest that segmental and suprasegmental processes in language are not governed directly by syntactic structure. Rather these processes reflect an independent prosodic structure, which includes prosodic categories such as metrical foot, prosodic word, and phonological phrase. Five experiments examined English-speaking two-year-olds' omissions of object articles in different prosodic structures. The data indicate that children omit unfooted syllables and that foot boundaries, in turn, are influenced by prosodic word and phonological phrase boundaries. Thus, it appears that children create prosodic structures remarkably similar to those proposed in theories of prosodic phonology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)683-712
Number of pages30
JournalLanguage
Volume72
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1996

Fingerprint

phonology
language
experiment
speaking
Prosodic Structure
Language Production
Young children
Prosodic Phonology
Experiment
Phonological Phrase
Prosodic Word
Suprasegmentals
Omission
Language
Metrical Feet
Speech Production
Syntactic Structure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Prosodic structure in young children's Language Production. / Gerken, Louann.

In: Language, Vol. 72, No. 4, 12.1996, p. 683-712.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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