Protein profile changes in acid adapted Listeria monocytogenes exhibiting cross-protection against an activated lactoperoxidase system in tryptic soy broth

Sadhana Ravishankar, Mark A. Harrison, Louise Wicker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Foodborne pathogens often tolerate and survive environmental stress conditions including extreme acidity to varying degrees. One possible reason for this survival may be the production of protective stress proteins during acid shock (ASR) and/or tolerance (ATR) responses. The ASR and ATR of Listeria monocytogenes strains V7, V37 and CA in tryptic soy broth without dextrose acidified with lactic acid were studied. Possible cross-protection of acid adapted cells against an activated lactoperoxidase system was also determined. The strains were either directly challenged at pH 4.0 and 3.5 to study their ASR or initially adapted at pH 5.5 for the equivalent of 1 generation before challenging at pH 4.0 and 3.5 to study their ATR. Adapted and nonadapted cells were challenged at pH 4.5 with or without an activated lactoperoxidase system. In all cases viability was determined by enumeration over a period of 24 or 48 h after challenge and the production of stress proteins analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. While there were some differences in the survival responses for each strain, the acid adapted cells of each strain survived to a greater degree than nonadapted cells at both pH 4.0 (at least 10 fold at 24 h) and pH 3.5 (at least 1000 fold at 6 h) but not at pH 4.5. The acid adapted cells exposed to the lactoperoxidase system survived better (at least 5-fold) than their nonadapted counterparts for all 3 strains at 24 and 48 h. The 2-dimensional gel analysis for all 3 strains showed that the adapted and nonadapted cells underwent a change in their physiology, (at pH 4.0 compared to the control at pH 7.0; at pH 4.5 with the addition of lactoperoxidase system components) in that there was induction as well as repression of several proteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-42
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Food Safety
Volume20
Issue number1
StatePublished - Apr 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cross Protection
Lactoperoxidase
Listeria monocytogenes
peroxidase
Acids
acids
Proteins
proteins
cells
Heat-Shock Proteins
Gels
trypticase-soy broth
food pathogens
lactic acid
gel electrophoresis
Electrophoresis
acidity
Shock
Lactic Acid
physiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Biotechnology

Cite this

Protein profile changes in acid adapted Listeria monocytogenes exhibiting cross-protection against an activated lactoperoxidase system in tryptic soy broth. / Ravishankar, Sadhana; Harrison, Mark A.; Wicker, Louise.

In: Journal of Food Safety, Vol. 20, No. 1, 04.2000, p. 27-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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