Psychological and physical distress are interdependent in breast cancer survivors and their partners

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

Method: Participants were 49 breast cancer survivors and their partners, who were spouses, other family members, or friends of the survivor. Psychological distress (depression, anxiety, and negative affect) and physical symptom distress were measured at three points in time, each separated by eight weeks.

Objective: Breast cancer diagnosis and treatment negatively affect quality of life in survivors and their supportive partners. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the degree of dyadic interdependence in psychological and physical symptom distress in dyads adjusting to breast cancer.

Results: Survivors and partners exhibited significant interdependence in psychological and physical symptom distress over the four-month course of the investigation. This was evident in longitudinal partner effects in actor-partner interdependence models as well as in significant T1→T3 indirect effects mediated by partner distress.

Conclusions: The course of breast cancer survivors psychological and physical symptom distress is significantly affected by that of their supportive partners and vice versa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)716-723
Number of pages8
JournalPsychology, Health and Medicine
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Close relationships
  • Depression
  • Dyadic interdependence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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