Psychological Distress and Social Support Availability in Different Family Caregivers of Latinas With Breast Cancer

Chris Segrin, Terry Badger, Alla Sikorskii

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Latinas with breast cancer draw on a diverse range of family members for informal care. Latin cultures typically prescribe high levels of support and care for an ill family member that leave caregivers vulnerable to compromised well-being. Method: In this cross-sectional survey study, 258 family caregivers of Latinas with breast cancer completed reports of psychological distress, availability of social support, and acculturation. Results: Mothers who provide care to a daughter with breast cancer experience higher levels of psychological distress and report lower availability of informational support than most other types of family caregivers. Mothers’ lower levels of acculturation may at least partially explain these reductions in well-being. Discussion: This study highlights the diverse range of family and fictive kin who participate in family caregiving for Latina breast cancer survivors. Spousal caregivers may not represent a unique population, whereas mothers as caregivers are indeed distinct for their higher distress levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-110
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Transcultural Nursing
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • cancer
  • caregiving
  • psychiatric/mental health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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