Psychology of auditory perception

Andrew J Lotto, Lori Holt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Audition is often treated as a 'secondary' sensory system behind vision in the study of cognitive science. In this review, we focus on three seemingly simple perceptual tasks to demonstrate the complexity of perceptual-cognitive processing involved in everyday audition. After providing a short overview of the characteristics of sound and their neural encoding, we present a description of the perceptual task of segregating multiple sound events that are mixed together in the signal reaching the ears. Then, we discuss the ability to localize the sound source in the environment. Finally, we provide some data and theory on how listeners categorize complex sounds, such as speech. In particular, we present research on how listeners weigh multiple acoustic cues in making a categorization decision. One conclusion of this review is that it is time for auditory cognitive science to be developed to match what has been done in vision in order for us to better understand how humans communicate with speech and music.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-489
Number of pages11
JournalWiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science
Volume2
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Auditory Perception
Psychology
Cognitive Science
Hearing
Aptitude
Music
Acoustics
Cues
Ear
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Psychology of auditory perception. / Lotto, Andrew J; Holt, Lori.

In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science, Vol. 2, No. 5, 09.2011, p. 479-489.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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