Puchwcwavaats uapi (to know about plants)

Traditional knowledge and the cultural significance of southern paiute plants

Richard W Stoffle, David B. Halmo, Michael J. Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper is about understanding the cultural significance of plants to the Southern Paiute people, who live in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah as members of 12 organized tribes, from both qualitative and quantitative, emic and etic, perspectives. Specifically, the analysis examines patterns of variation in plant cultural significance scores and the factors that account for variations in these patterns. Findings from the analysis, based on four cultural-resource-assessment projects, suggest that such studies should incorporate adequate fieldwork time for multiple interviews on the same plant with elders and women as consultants, especially elders who are female.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)416-429
Number of pages14
JournalHuman Organization
Volume58
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1999

Fingerprint

ethnic group
interview
resources
Traditional Knowledge
Elders
Paiute
Cultural Significance
time
Consultants
Emic
Field Work
Resources
Tribes

Keywords

  • Cultural resource assessment
  • Cultural significance
  • Ethnobotany
  • Intracultural variation
  • Southern Paiutes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Puchwcwavaats uapi (to know about plants) : Traditional knowledge and the cultural significance of southern paiute plants. / Stoffle, Richard W; Halmo, David B.; Evans, Michael J.

In: Human Organization, Vol. 58, No. 4, 1999, p. 416-429.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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