Pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hemorrhage and pulmonary infarction

J. E. Dalen, C. I. Haffajee, Joseph S Alpert, J. P. Howe, I. S. Ockene, J. A. Paraskos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

143 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors compared 41 patients with angiographic proof of pulmonary embolism and clinical signs of pulmonary infarction (as evidenced by an infiltrate on x-ray study and pleuritic pain in the area of the embolus) with 24 patients with pulmonary embolism but without infarction. Only 18 of the 41 patients with pulmonary infarction had associated heart disease. Pulmonary infarction was uncommon when emboli obstructed central arteries but frequent when distal arteries were occluded. Follow-up x-ray examination showed that the infiltrates resolved in the patients with pulmonary infarction without heart disease, but persisted when heart disease was present. The authors suggest that obstruction of distal arteries results in pulmonary hemorrhage owing to an influx of bronchial arterial blood at systemic pressure. Hemorrhage causes symptoms and x-ray changes usually attributed to pulmonary infarction. However, hemorrhage resolves without infarction in patients without, but progresses to infarction in those with, heart disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1431-1435
Number of pages5
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume296
Issue number25
StatePublished - 1977
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pulmonary Infarction
Pulmonary Embolism
Hemorrhage
Heart Diseases
Lung
Infarction
Arteries
X-Rays
Embolism
Pressure
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dalen, J. E., Haffajee, C. I., Alpert, J. S., Howe, J. P., Ockene, I. S., & Paraskos, J. A. (1977). Pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hemorrhage and pulmonary infarction. New England Journal of Medicine, 296(25), 1431-1435.

Pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hemorrhage and pulmonary infarction. / Dalen, J. E.; Haffajee, C. I.; Alpert, Joseph S; Howe, J. P.; Ockene, I. S.; Paraskos, J. A.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 296, No. 25, 1977, p. 1431-1435.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dalen, JE, Haffajee, CI, Alpert, JS, Howe, JP, Ockene, IS & Paraskos, JA 1977, 'Pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hemorrhage and pulmonary infarction', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 296, no. 25, pp. 1431-1435.
Dalen JE, Haffajee CI, Alpert JS, Howe JP, Ockene IS, Paraskos JA. Pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hemorrhage and pulmonary infarction. New England Journal of Medicine. 1977;296(25):1431-1435.
Dalen, J. E. ; Haffajee, C. I. ; Alpert, Joseph S ; Howe, J. P. ; Ockene, I. S. ; Paraskos, J. A. / Pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hemorrhage and pulmonary infarction. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1977 ; Vol. 296, No. 25. pp. 1431-1435.
@article{fe3d07e032e247ec94aa1b17c1302370,
title = "Pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hemorrhage and pulmonary infarction",
abstract = "The authors compared 41 patients with angiographic proof of pulmonary embolism and clinical signs of pulmonary infarction (as evidenced by an infiltrate on x-ray study and pleuritic pain in the area of the embolus) with 24 patients with pulmonary embolism but without infarction. Only 18 of the 41 patients with pulmonary infarction had associated heart disease. Pulmonary infarction was uncommon when emboli obstructed central arteries but frequent when distal arteries were occluded. Follow-up x-ray examination showed that the infiltrates resolved in the patients with pulmonary infarction without heart disease, but persisted when heart disease was present. The authors suggest that obstruction of distal arteries results in pulmonary hemorrhage owing to an influx of bronchial arterial blood at systemic pressure. Hemorrhage causes symptoms and x-ray changes usually attributed to pulmonary infarction. However, hemorrhage resolves without infarction in patients without, but progresses to infarction in those with, heart disease.",
author = "Dalen, {J. E.} and Haffajee, {C. I.} and Alpert, {Joseph S} and Howe, {J. P.} and Ockene, {I. S.} and Paraskos, {J. A.}",
year = "1977",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "296",
pages = "1431--1435",
journal = "New England Journal of Medicine",
issn = "0028-4793",
publisher = "Massachussetts Medical Society",
number = "25",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hemorrhage and pulmonary infarction

AU - Dalen, J. E.

AU - Haffajee, C. I.

AU - Alpert, Joseph S

AU - Howe, J. P.

AU - Ockene, I. S.

AU - Paraskos, J. A.

PY - 1977

Y1 - 1977

N2 - The authors compared 41 patients with angiographic proof of pulmonary embolism and clinical signs of pulmonary infarction (as evidenced by an infiltrate on x-ray study and pleuritic pain in the area of the embolus) with 24 patients with pulmonary embolism but without infarction. Only 18 of the 41 patients with pulmonary infarction had associated heart disease. Pulmonary infarction was uncommon when emboli obstructed central arteries but frequent when distal arteries were occluded. Follow-up x-ray examination showed that the infiltrates resolved in the patients with pulmonary infarction without heart disease, but persisted when heart disease was present. The authors suggest that obstruction of distal arteries results in pulmonary hemorrhage owing to an influx of bronchial arterial blood at systemic pressure. Hemorrhage causes symptoms and x-ray changes usually attributed to pulmonary infarction. However, hemorrhage resolves without infarction in patients without, but progresses to infarction in those with, heart disease.

AB - The authors compared 41 patients with angiographic proof of pulmonary embolism and clinical signs of pulmonary infarction (as evidenced by an infiltrate on x-ray study and pleuritic pain in the area of the embolus) with 24 patients with pulmonary embolism but without infarction. Only 18 of the 41 patients with pulmonary infarction had associated heart disease. Pulmonary infarction was uncommon when emboli obstructed central arteries but frequent when distal arteries were occluded. Follow-up x-ray examination showed that the infiltrates resolved in the patients with pulmonary infarction without heart disease, but persisted when heart disease was present. The authors suggest that obstruction of distal arteries results in pulmonary hemorrhage owing to an influx of bronchial arterial blood at systemic pressure. Hemorrhage causes symptoms and x-ray changes usually attributed to pulmonary infarction. However, hemorrhage resolves without infarction in patients without, but progresses to infarction in those with, heart disease.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0017757414&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0017757414&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 865513

AN - SCOPUS:0017757414

VL - 296

SP - 1431

EP - 1435

JO - New England Journal of Medicine

JF - New England Journal of Medicine

SN - 0028-4793

IS - 25

ER -