Qualitative change in executive control during childhood and adulthood

Nicolas Chevalier, Kristina L. Huber, Sandra A. Wiebe, Kimberly Andrews Espy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Executive control development typically has been conceptualized to result from quantitative changes in the efficiency of the underlying processes. In contrast, the present study addressed the possibility of qualitative change with age by examining how children and adults detect task switches. Participants in three age groups (5- and 10-year-old children, young adults) completed two conditions of a cued task-switching paradigm where task cues were presented either in isolation or in conjunction with transition cues. Five-year-olds performed better with transition cues, whereas the reverse effect was observed at age 10 and with adults. Unlike 5-year-olds who detect switches after semantically processing cues, older participants strategically detect switches based on perceptual processing only. Age-related qualitative changes promote increasingly optimal adjustment of executive resources with age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalCognition
Volume128
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Executive Function
adulthood
Cues
childhood
Social Adjustment
young adult
age group
Young Adult
social isolation
Age Groups
paradigm
Efficiency
efficiency
Executive Control
Childhood
Adulthood
resources

Keywords

  • Development
  • Executive control
  • Set-shifting
  • Strategy
  • Working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Qualitative change in executive control during childhood and adulthood. / Chevalier, Nicolas; Huber, Kristina L.; Wiebe, Sandra A.; Espy, Kimberly Andrews.

In: Cognition, Vol. 128, No. 1, 2013, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chevalier, Nicolas ; Huber, Kristina L. ; Wiebe, Sandra A. ; Espy, Kimberly Andrews. / Qualitative change in executive control during childhood and adulthood. In: Cognition. 2013 ; Vol. 128, No. 1. pp. 1-12.
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