Race and Reactions to Women’s Expressions of Anger at Work: Examiningthe Effects of the “Angry Black Woman” Stereotype

Daphna Motro, Jonathan B. Evans, Aleksander P.J. Ellis, Lehman Benson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Across two studies (n = 555), we examine the detrimental effects of the “angry black woman” stereotype in the workplace. Drawing on parallel-constraint-satisfaction theory, we argue that observers will be particularly sensitive to expressions of anger by black women due to widely held stereotypes. In Study 1, we examine a three-way interaction among anger, race, and gender, and find that observers are more likely to make internal attributions for expressions of anger when an individual is a black woman, which then leads to worse performance evaluations and assessments of leadership capability. In Study 2, we focus solely on women and expand our initial model by examining stereotype activation as a mechanism linking the effects of anger and race on internal attributions. We replicated findings from Study 1 and found support for stereotype activation as an underlying mechanism. We believe our work contributes to research on race, gender, and leadership, and highlights an overlooked stereotype in the management literature. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)142-152
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume107
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Keywords

  • Anger
  • Attribution
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Stereotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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