Race, genetic west African ancestry, and prostate cancer prediction by prostate-specific antigen in prospectively screened high-risk men

Veda N. Giri, Brian Egleston, Karen Ruth, Robert G. Uzzo, David Y.T. Chen, Mark Buyyounouski, Susan Raysor, Stanley Hooker, Jada Benn Torres, Teniel Ramike, Kathleen Mastalski, Taylor Y. Kim, Rick Kittles

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42 Scopus citations

Abstract

"Race-specific" prostate-specific antigen (PSA) needs evaluation in men at high risk for prostate cancer for optimizing early detection. Baseline PSA and longitudinal prediction for prostate cancer were examined by self-reported race and genetic West African (WA) ancestry in the Prostate Cancer Risk Assessment Program, a prospective high-risk cohort. Eligibility criteria were age 35 to 69 years, family history of prostate cancer, African American race, or BRCA1/2 mutations. Biopsies were done at low PSA values (<4.0 ng/mL). WA ancestry was discerned by genotyping 100 ancestry informative markers. Cox proportional hazards models evaluated baseline PSA, self-reported race, and genetic WA ancestry. Cox models were used for 3-year predictions for prostate cancer. Six hundred forty-six men (63% African American) were analyzed. Individual WA ancestry estimates varied widely among self-reported African American men. Race-specific differences in baseline PSA were not found by self-reported race or genetic WA ancestry. Among men with ≥1 follow-up visit (405 total, 54% African American), 3-year prediction for prostate cancer with a PSA of 1.5 to 4.0 ng/mL was higher in African American men with age in the model (P = 0.025) compared with European American men. Hazard ratios of PSA for prostate cancer were also higher by self-reported race (1.59 for African American versus 1.32 for European American, P = 0.04). There was a trend for increasing prediction for prostate cancer with increasing genetic WA ancestry. "Race-specific" PSA may need to be redefined as higher prediction for prostate cancer at any given PSA in African American men. Large-scale studies are needed to confirm if genetic WA ancestry explains these findings to make progress in personalizing prostate cancer early detection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)244-250
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Prevention Research
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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    Giri, V. N., Egleston, B., Ruth, K., Uzzo, R. G., Chen, D. Y. T., Buyyounouski, M., Raysor, S., Hooker, S., Torres, J. B., Ramike, T., Mastalski, K., Kim, T. Y., & Kittles, R. (2009). Race, genetic west African ancestry, and prostate cancer prediction by prostate-specific antigen in prospectively screened high-risk men. Cancer Prevention Research, 2(3), 244-250. https://doi.org/10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-08-0150