Race, genetic west African ancestry, and prostate cancer prediction by prostate-specific antigen in prospectively screened high-risk men

Veda N. Giri, Brian Egleston, Karen Ruth, Robert G. Uzzo, David Y T Chen, Mark Buyyounouski, Susan Raysor, Stanley Hooker, Jada Benn Torres, Teniel Ramike, Kathleen Mastalski, Taylor Y. Kim, Rick A Kittles

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Abstract

"Race-specific" prostate-specific antigen (PSA) needs evaluation in men at high risk for prostate cancer for optimizing early detection. Baseline PSA and longitudinal prediction for prostate cancer were examined by self-reported race and genetic West African (WA) ancestry in the Prostate Cancer Risk Assessment Program, a prospective high-risk cohort. Eligibility criteria were age 35 to 69 years, family history of prostate cancer, African American race, or BRCA1/2 mutations. Biopsies were done at low PSA values (<4.0 ng/mL). WA ancestry was discerned by genotyping 100 ancestry informative markers. Cox proportional hazards models evaluated baseline PSA, self-reported race, and genetic WA ancestry. Cox models were used for 3-year predictions for prostate cancer. Six hundred forty-six men (63% African American) were analyzed. Individual WA ancestry estimates varied widely among self-reported African American men. Race-specific differences in baseline PSA were not found by self-reported race or genetic WA ancestry. Among men with ≥1 follow-up visit (405 total, 54% African American), 3-year prediction for prostate cancer with a PSA of 1.5 to 4.0 ng/mL was higher in African American men with age in the model (P = 0.025) compared with European American men. Hazard ratios of PSA for prostate cancer were also higher by self-reported race (1.59 for African American versus 1.32 for European American, P = 0.04). There was a trend for increasing prediction for prostate cancer with increasing genetic WA ancestry. "Race-specific" PSA may need to be redefined as higher prediction for prostate cancer at any given PSA in African American men. Large-scale studies are needed to confirm if genetic WA ancestry explains these findings to make progress in personalizing prostate cancer early detection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)244-250
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Prevention Research
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Prostate-Specific Antigen
Prostatic Neoplasms
African Americans
Proportional Hazards Models
Biopsy
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Race, genetic west African ancestry, and prostate cancer prediction by prostate-specific antigen in prospectively screened high-risk men. / Giri, Veda N.; Egleston, Brian; Ruth, Karen; Uzzo, Robert G.; Chen, David Y T; Buyyounouski, Mark; Raysor, Susan; Hooker, Stanley; Torres, Jada Benn; Ramike, Teniel; Mastalski, Kathleen; Kim, Taylor Y.; Kittles, Rick A.

In: Cancer Prevention Research, Vol. 2, No. 3, 03.2009, p. 244-250.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Giri, VN, Egleston, B, Ruth, K, Uzzo, RG, Chen, DYT, Buyyounouski, M, Raysor, S, Hooker, S, Torres, JB, Ramike, T, Mastalski, K, Kim, TY & Kittles, RA 2009, 'Race, genetic west African ancestry, and prostate cancer prediction by prostate-specific antigen in prospectively screened high-risk men', Cancer Prevention Research, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 244-250. https://doi.org/10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-08-0150
Giri, Veda N. ; Egleston, Brian ; Ruth, Karen ; Uzzo, Robert G. ; Chen, David Y T ; Buyyounouski, Mark ; Raysor, Susan ; Hooker, Stanley ; Torres, Jada Benn ; Ramike, Teniel ; Mastalski, Kathleen ; Kim, Taylor Y. ; Kittles, Rick A. / Race, genetic west African ancestry, and prostate cancer prediction by prostate-specific antigen in prospectively screened high-risk men. In: Cancer Prevention Research. 2009 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 244-250.
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AU - Buyyounouski, Mark

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AU - Hooker, Stanley

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AU - Kim, Taylor Y.

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