Racial disparities in the incidence of colon cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

Priyanka Vij, Debbie Chen, Chiu-Hsieh Hsu, Viraj Pandit, Pamela Omesiete, Emad - Elquza, Aaron Scott, Alejandro Cruz, Valentine N Nfonsam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Studies have explored the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) [ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD)] and colon cancer (CC). Additionally, racial disparities in the incidence of CC is well known. However, the impact of racial disparity in IBD patients who develop CC remains unclear. The aim of this study is to address the knowledge gap in this particular group of patients. Methods: A retrospective analysis was done using the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2011. We included patients with IBD over age ≥18 years with a diagnosis of CC. Patients were stratified by race, gender, age, presence of IBD and CC. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the groups. Results: A total of 57,542 patients were included (CD: 36,357, UC: 21,001). Of all patients with and without IBD, advanced age, Black and Asian race conferred an increased risk of developing CC, whereas female gender, Hispanic and Native American race conferred a protective effect. In patients with IBD, advanced age conferred an increased risk for developing CC while female gender conferred a protective effect. In this subset of patients, black race conferred a protective effect. Conclusions: Racial disparity exists in the overall incidence of CC and among patients with IBD who develop CC. Interestingly, black race conferred a protective effect for patients with IBD, contrary to what is seen in the general population. These findings could be attributed to the environmental factors and genetic makeup between racial groups. Further studies are warranted to better understand these disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-258
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Oncology
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Colonic Neoplasms
Incidence
Ulcerative Colitis
Crohn Disease
North American Indians
Hispanic Americans
Inpatients
Databases

Keywords

  • Colon cancer (CC)
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
  • Racial disparity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Racial disparities in the incidence of colon cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. / Vij, Priyanka; Chen, Debbie; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Pandit, Viraj; Omesiete, Pamela; Elquza, Emad -; Scott, Aaron; Cruz, Alejandro; Nfonsam, Valentine N.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology, Vol. 10, No. 2, 01.04.2019, p. 254-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vij, Priyanka ; Chen, Debbie ; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh ; Pandit, Viraj ; Omesiete, Pamela ; Elquza, Emad - ; Scott, Aaron ; Cruz, Alejandro ; Nfonsam, Valentine N. / Racial disparities in the incidence of colon cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology. 2019 ; Vol. 10, No. 2. pp. 254-258.
@article{286419cb18094ee39885f200fc6d68ba,
title = "Racial disparities in the incidence of colon cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease",
abstract = "Background: Studies have explored the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) [ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD)] and colon cancer (CC). Additionally, racial disparities in the incidence of CC is well known. However, the impact of racial disparity in IBD patients who develop CC remains unclear. The aim of this study is to address the knowledge gap in this particular group of patients. Methods: A retrospective analysis was done using the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2011. We included patients with IBD over age ≥18 years with a diagnosis of CC. Patients were stratified by race, gender, age, presence of IBD and CC. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the groups. Results: A total of 57,542 patients were included (CD: 36,357, UC: 21,001). Of all patients with and without IBD, advanced age, Black and Asian race conferred an increased risk of developing CC, whereas female gender, Hispanic and Native American race conferred a protective effect. In patients with IBD, advanced age conferred an increased risk for developing CC while female gender conferred a protective effect. In this subset of patients, black race conferred a protective effect. Conclusions: Racial disparity exists in the overall incidence of CC and among patients with IBD who develop CC. Interestingly, black race conferred a protective effect for patients with IBD, contrary to what is seen in the general population. These findings could be attributed to the environmental factors and genetic makeup between racial groups. Further studies are warranted to better understand these disparities.",
keywords = "Colon cancer (CC), Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Racial disparity",
author = "Priyanka Vij and Debbie Chen and Chiu-Hsieh Hsu and Viraj Pandit and Pamela Omesiete and Elquza, {Emad -} and Aaron Scott and Alejandro Cruz and Nfonsam, {Valentine N}",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.21037/jgo.2019.01.06",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "254--258",
journal = "Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology",
issn = "2078-6891",
publisher = "Pioneer Bioscience Publishing Company (PBPC)",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Racial disparities in the incidence of colon cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

AU - Vij, Priyanka

AU - Chen, Debbie

AU - Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh

AU - Pandit, Viraj

AU - Omesiete, Pamela

AU - Elquza, Emad -

AU - Scott, Aaron

AU - Cruz, Alejandro

AU - Nfonsam, Valentine N

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - Background: Studies have explored the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) [ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD)] and colon cancer (CC). Additionally, racial disparities in the incidence of CC is well known. However, the impact of racial disparity in IBD patients who develop CC remains unclear. The aim of this study is to address the knowledge gap in this particular group of patients. Methods: A retrospective analysis was done using the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2011. We included patients with IBD over age ≥18 years with a diagnosis of CC. Patients were stratified by race, gender, age, presence of IBD and CC. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the groups. Results: A total of 57,542 patients were included (CD: 36,357, UC: 21,001). Of all patients with and without IBD, advanced age, Black and Asian race conferred an increased risk of developing CC, whereas female gender, Hispanic and Native American race conferred a protective effect. In patients with IBD, advanced age conferred an increased risk for developing CC while female gender conferred a protective effect. In this subset of patients, black race conferred a protective effect. Conclusions: Racial disparity exists in the overall incidence of CC and among patients with IBD who develop CC. Interestingly, black race conferred a protective effect for patients with IBD, contrary to what is seen in the general population. These findings could be attributed to the environmental factors and genetic makeup between racial groups. Further studies are warranted to better understand these disparities.

AB - Background: Studies have explored the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) [ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD)] and colon cancer (CC). Additionally, racial disparities in the incidence of CC is well known. However, the impact of racial disparity in IBD patients who develop CC remains unclear. The aim of this study is to address the knowledge gap in this particular group of patients. Methods: A retrospective analysis was done using the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2011. We included patients with IBD over age ≥18 years with a diagnosis of CC. Patients were stratified by race, gender, age, presence of IBD and CC. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the groups. Results: A total of 57,542 patients were included (CD: 36,357, UC: 21,001). Of all patients with and without IBD, advanced age, Black and Asian race conferred an increased risk of developing CC, whereas female gender, Hispanic and Native American race conferred a protective effect. In patients with IBD, advanced age conferred an increased risk for developing CC while female gender conferred a protective effect. In this subset of patients, black race conferred a protective effect. Conclusions: Racial disparity exists in the overall incidence of CC and among patients with IBD who develop CC. Interestingly, black race conferred a protective effect for patients with IBD, contrary to what is seen in the general population. These findings could be attributed to the environmental factors and genetic makeup between racial groups. Further studies are warranted to better understand these disparities.

KW - Colon cancer (CC)

KW - Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

KW - Racial disparity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065080475&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85065080475&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.21037/jgo.2019.01.06

DO - 10.21037/jgo.2019.01.06

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85065080475

VL - 10

SP - 254

EP - 258

JO - Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology

JF - Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology

SN - 2078-6891

IS - 2

ER -