Racial Politics and Racial Self-Identification: A Case Study of Arizona, 2010-2011

Nolan L Cabrera, Matthew R. Holliday

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between Arizona’s anti-Latina/o policies and changing patterns of racial self-identification for students at the University of Arizona. Using institutional data and the university’s Entering Student Survey, we explored trends in racial/ethnic self-identification between two cohorts of students: one before and one after the summer of 2010 (passage of SB1070, HB2281, and Proposition 107). Descriptive analyses revealed that both White and Latina/o students declined to state a racial/ethnic background at substantially higher rates after the passages of the bills. After the passage of the legislation, Latina/os used “Mexican” identifiers at substantially lower rates and “White” identifiers at substantially higher rates. Implications are discussed for racial/ethnic self-identification and higher education practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-149
Number of pages19
JournalHispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Fingerprint

Politics
Hispanic Americans
Students
politics
student
Legislation
bill
legislation
Education
trend
education

Keywords

  • Arizona
  • HB2281
  • Latina/o identity
  • Proposition 107
  • racial identification
  • racial politics
  • SB1070
  • White identity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Racial Politics and Racial Self-Identification : A Case Study of Arizona, 2010-2011. / Cabrera, Nolan L; Holliday, Matthew R.

In: Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, Vol. 39, No. 2, 01.05.2017, p. 131-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4b5238ceda604ecc8dd4d1eb6452cec8,
title = "Racial Politics and Racial Self-Identification: A Case Study of Arizona, 2010-2011",
abstract = "This study examines the relationship between Arizona’s anti-Latina/o policies and changing patterns of racial self-identification for students at the University of Arizona. Using institutional data and the university’s Entering Student Survey, we explored trends in racial/ethnic self-identification between two cohorts of students: one before and one after the summer of 2010 (passage of SB1070, HB2281, and Proposition 107). Descriptive analyses revealed that both White and Latina/o students declined to state a racial/ethnic background at substantially higher rates after the passages of the bills. After the passage of the legislation, Latina/os used “Mexican” identifiers at substantially lower rates and “White” identifiers at substantially higher rates. Implications are discussed for racial/ethnic self-identification and higher education practice.",
keywords = "Arizona, HB2281, Latina/o identity, Proposition 107, racial identification, racial politics, SB1070, White identity",
author = "Cabrera, {Nolan L} and Holliday, {Matthew R.}",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0739986317700417",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "131--149",
journal = "Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences",
issn = "0739-9863",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Racial Politics and Racial Self-Identification

T2 - A Case Study of Arizona, 2010-2011

AU - Cabrera, Nolan L

AU - Holliday, Matthew R.

PY - 2017/5/1

Y1 - 2017/5/1

N2 - This study examines the relationship between Arizona’s anti-Latina/o policies and changing patterns of racial self-identification for students at the University of Arizona. Using institutional data and the university’s Entering Student Survey, we explored trends in racial/ethnic self-identification between two cohorts of students: one before and one after the summer of 2010 (passage of SB1070, HB2281, and Proposition 107). Descriptive analyses revealed that both White and Latina/o students declined to state a racial/ethnic background at substantially higher rates after the passages of the bills. After the passage of the legislation, Latina/os used “Mexican” identifiers at substantially lower rates and “White” identifiers at substantially higher rates. Implications are discussed for racial/ethnic self-identification and higher education practice.

AB - This study examines the relationship between Arizona’s anti-Latina/o policies and changing patterns of racial self-identification for students at the University of Arizona. Using institutional data and the university’s Entering Student Survey, we explored trends in racial/ethnic self-identification between two cohorts of students: one before and one after the summer of 2010 (passage of SB1070, HB2281, and Proposition 107). Descriptive analyses revealed that both White and Latina/o students declined to state a racial/ethnic background at substantially higher rates after the passages of the bills. After the passage of the legislation, Latina/os used “Mexican” identifiers at substantially lower rates and “White” identifiers at substantially higher rates. Implications are discussed for racial/ethnic self-identification and higher education practice.

KW - Arizona

KW - HB2281

KW - Latina/o identity

KW - Proposition 107

KW - racial identification

KW - racial politics

KW - SB1070

KW - White identity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85018372968&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85018372968&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0739986317700417

DO - 10.1177/0739986317700417

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85018372968

VL - 39

SP - 131

EP - 149

JO - Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences

JF - Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences

SN - 0739-9863

IS - 2

ER -